Hispanic American Diversity

Hispanic American Diversity - H ispanic American Diversity...

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Hispanic American Diversity Loretta Campbell Cultural Diversity Elizabeth Sherrell-Smith March 27, 2011 Loretta Campbell 03/27/2011
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Mexico is a Latin American country, and Mexicans are proud of their country, culture, and lifestyle and try to preserve it as much as possible even when living outside of Mexico. Mexican Americans speak Spanish language and tend to continue to use their language even after living in the United States or other countries. Most Mexican Americans may learn English however; they will never allow the English language to overtake their native language. For instance, according to the 2002 Survey of the Pew Hispanic Center, nearly half of the second generation is English dominant, and nearly half is bilingual, when the definitions of language proficiency entail both speaking and writing (Alba, Richard 2006). Mexican Americans exhibit strong family ties. They love and take care of their family and love to spend time with them. Most of their time is spent around their religion; a large number follows religions like the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Jehovah’s Witnesses. Mexican Americans are viewed as minorities and are discriminated on mostly because they did not originate in the United States. Throughout the history of immigration to America, Mexicans seem to have made little progress in moving up from immigrant status to mainstream social status, partly because the amount of discrimination and the poor educational systems provided (Alba, Richard 2006). Puerto Ricans are Roman Catholics, mixed with various denominations of Protestant faiths. The language that they speak is Castillian Spanish. English is taught from elementary school but Spanish remains the primary language in Puerto Rico. Puerto Ricans have their own Constitution and elect their own bicameral legislature and governor but are subject to U.S. executive authority (Green, Derek 2011). Puerto Ricans traditionally believe in espiritismo, the notion that the world is populated by spirits who can communicate with the living through dreams. Many Puerto Ricans customs revolve around the ritual significance of food and drink. As in other Latino cultures, it is considered an Loretta Campbell 03/27/2011
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insult to turn down a drink offered by a friend or stranger. It’s customary for Puerto Ricans
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This note was uploaded on 05/29/2011 for the course POS 110 taught by Professor Britt,j during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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Hispanic American Diversity - H ispanic American Diversity...

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