Fluid and Acid Base balance

Fluid and Acid Base balance - Answer this The body...

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1 Answer this The body compensates for chronic respiratory alkalosis by: A. increasing excretion of bicarbonate. B. decreasing excretion of bicarbonate. C. increasing Pco2. D. decreasing Pco2. Answer: A When hypocapnia lasts more than 6 hours, the body develops respiratory alkalosis and the kidneys compensate by increasing excretion of bicarbonate and reducing excretion of hydrogen ions. Hydrogen ions return to the blood to decrease pH Answer this You’re taking care of a patient with obesity-hypoventilation syndrome. You expect to see signs of chronic respiratory acidosis in the patient’s ABC results. What do you look for? A. Increasing pH B. Increased Paco2 C. Increased bicarbonate D. Decreased bicarbonate Answer C – As respiratory mechanisms fail, the body compensates by excrete hydrogen and stimulate the kidneys to retain bicarbonate and sodium ions As a result, more sodium bicarbonate (thus an increased bicarbonate) is available to buffer free hydrogen ions (metabolic alkalosis). Ammonium ions are also excreted to remove hydrogen
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2 Answer this If your patient’s NG tube is attached to suction, you know the patient may develop metabolic alkalosis. You expect that his ABGs results will show: A. decreased pH, increased Paco2, and decreased bicarbonate. B. increased pH, increased Paco2, and increased bicarbonate. C. decreased pH, decreased Pace2, and decreased bicarbonate. D. increased pH, decreased Paco2, and no change in bicarbonate. Answer: B – Metabolic alkalosis is caused by a loss in hydrogen ion production and a gain in bicarbonate, causing increased pH and bicarbonate levels. If respiratory compensation occurs, Paco2 will increase above 45 mm Hg. Answer this When assessing a patient with Diabetes ketoacidosis you detect Kussmaul’s respirations. You realize the body is in: A. respiratory alkalosis with compensation. B. respiratory acidosis with compensation. C. metabolic alkalosis with compensation. D. metabolic acidosis with compensation. Answer: D. – A patient with DKA will develop metabolic acidosis. When excess hydrogen can’t be buffered, the hydrogen reduces blood pH and stimulates Chemoreceptors in the medulla, which in turn increases the respiratory rate (leading to respiratory alkalosis). This mechanism lowers carbon dioxide levels and allows more hydrogen to bind with bicarbonate.
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3 Answer this a patient with COPD, the primary imbalance is likely to be: A. respiratory alkalosis. B. respiratory acidosis. C. metabolic alkalosis. D. metabolic acidosis. Answer: B – COPD results in destruction of the alveoli, thereby decreasing the surface area of the lungs available for gas exchange. With alveolar ventilation decreased, the Paco2 increases. The CO2 combines H2O to form excessive amounts of H2CO3. The carbonic acid dissociates to release free hydrogen and bicarbonate ions, thereby decreasing the pH. Answer this
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This note was uploaded on 05/29/2011 for the course BIO 233 taught by Professor Salti during the Spring '11 term at Portland CC.

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Fluid and Acid Base balance - Answer this The body...

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