How to write an essay - Howtowriteanessay 1.Whatisanessay?

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
  How to write an essay          1.  What is an essay?   2.  Why write in this way?   2.1  Learning how to write professionally   3.  Collecting the material   3.1  What are critics for?   3.2  Books and articles   3.3  Using the World Wide Web   4.  Reading, making notes, having ideas   4.1  Making notes   4.2  Bibliography   5.  Planning and structuring   5.1  The outline   5.2  The paragraph  
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6.  Presentation   6.1.  The list of works consulted   6.2.  Styling references   6.3.  Type it if at all possible   6.4.  One side of the paper only   6.5.  Spelling and punctuation   6.6.  Handing it in   7.  How to write   8.  Getting it back   9.  Two how-to-do-it books   10.  Useful Links     Note: this document was originally written for first year students about to write their first essay on Kurt  Vonnegut. I've revised it to make it more generally applicable. Since the standard that it asks for is  high, it applies, certainly, to strategies for writing assessed essays in the first year and in the second  year of the English course, and indeed to the third year dissertation. The ideas that are in it are only my ideas. Other lecturers may disagree; so may you. Please read this,  as anything else you read, not passively, but critically. If you find it's not useful, don't use it: go ahead  and do otherwise. Tom Davis 1. What is an essay? An organised collection of YOUR IDEAS about literary texts nicely written and professionally presented .  In other words, the essay must be well structured (ie organised) and presented in a way that the 
Background image of page 2
reader finds easy to follow and clear: it must look tidy and not present any obstacles to the  reader. It must have a clear readable interesting style. But, above all, it must consist of your  ideas about literary texts. This is the centre of it: this, and this only, gets the marks. Not quotes  from critics, not generalisations at second hand about literary history, not filling and padding;  your thoughts, that you have had while in the act of reading specific bits of literary texts, which  can be adduced in the form of quotations to back up your arguments. 2. Why write in this way? 2.1 Learning how to write professionally  In the English Department you learn how to respond to literary texts. This is an interesting and  worthwhile thing to do, but unless you become a teacher of English remarkably few people in  later life will be interested in your thoughts about Jane Austen. What they will be interested in  (I'm talking about potential employers now, but not only them) is your ability to talk, to think, and 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 05/30/2011 for the course MIM 1001 taught by Professor Fredser during the Spring '11 term at International University in Germany.

Page1 / 15

How to write an essay - Howtowriteanessay 1.Whatisanessay?

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online