Legislation Legacy

Legislation Legacy - Legislation Legacy Ethics Amy Croall...

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Legislation Legacy Ethics Amy Croall April 1, 2011 In 1996, five Native Americans filed a claim against the United States Department of the Interior and the United States Department of the Treasury. This court case was formerly known as Cobell v Babbitt , and was then renamed Cobell v Norton . It is now known as Cobell v Kempthorne given that this claim has continued through the terms of three Secretaries of the Interior. At present, this claim is a class action suit on behalf of roughly 500,000 Native Americans and their beneficiaries (Sisk, 2005). The reason for the claim is to push the government to account for money contained in a trust for the Native Americans and to create an everlasting reorganization of the trust system. The essential details of this claim date back to 1887. Under the "General Allotment Act of 1887" (known also as the "Dawes Act"), tribal lands were separated into parcels of between eighty and one hundred sixty acres of land. Thousands of individual Native Americans were owed
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Legislation Legacy - Legislation Legacy Ethics Amy Croall...

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