edc_2011_01 - PART ONE INTRODUCTION 1 2 Chapter 1...

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1 PART ONE INTRODUCTION
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Chapter 1: Introduction 3 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION Chapter outline Why teach design and communication together? Design and design-thinking: complex processes to solve complex problems Conceptual design vs. detailed design Communication: a central design activity EDC course goals –D e s i g n Teamwork and project management Communication A case study: real clients, real projects, real audiences Understanding the background: what the client wants Becoming an expert and identifying the problem Generating alternatives Proposing a solution Key guidelines for the design and communication process Follow a disciplined process to solve design problems: Research the problem by talking to the client, observing users, and getting information from experts Define the problem in terms of a clear mission statement Generate alternatives for solving the problem Build and test those alternatives with potential users Decide on a design direction and present it to peers and experts for review Refine the design, build it, and test it Deliver the final design to the client in the form of a prototype, final report, and oral presentation
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Chapter 1: Introduction 4 Throughout the process, employ good teamwork practices and effec- tive project management to ensure a high quality final product The idea of design—of making something that has not existed before—is central to engineering. – Henry Petroski, To Engineer is Human (1985, p. xi) This textbook for Engineering Design and Communication (EDC) will intro- duce you to what most people consider the heart of engineering: complex problem solving that leads to new products and solutions. The text has been written just for you—McCormick freshmen in the introductory course in design and communication. EDC teaches you design while you actually do design. From the beginning, you'll be working on real projects—involving real people who need your products and audiences who are not simply your instructors. The textbook will introduce you to the design and communication process you’ll need for doing that work well. The best way to use the textbook is to read the required sections listed in the syllabus, and then to review the specific sections that are relevant to your projects when you need them. 1.1 WHY TEACH DESIGN AND COMMUNICATION TOGETHER? 1.1.1 Design and design-thinking: complex processes to solve complex problems Societies are often known by their achievements in design, such as their pyra- mids, roads, or computers. It is the designer or engineer who synthesizes these new forms, who develops the ideas, goals, and requirements for the produc- tion of bridges, automobiles, and electric guitars. Henry Petroski, professor of Civil Engineering at Duke University and author of Invention by Design: How Engineers Get from Thought to Thing
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edc_2011_01 - PART ONE INTRODUCTION 1 2 Chapter 1...

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