edc_2011_12 - PART THREE TEAMWORK AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT...

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125 PART THREE TEAMWORK AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT CHAPTERS 12 CREATING A HIGH PERFORMANCE TEAM 13 DEVELOPING LEADERSHIP AND MANAGING CONFLICT 14 CONDUCTING MEETINGS 15 KEEPING A PROJECT FOLDER 16 WRITING AS A TEAM 17 PROJECT SCHEDULING
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Chapter 12: Creating a High Performance Team 127 CHAPTER 12: CREATING A HIGH PERFORMANCE TEAM Chapter outline How teams develop What makes a team succeed What causes teams to fail Key guidelines for creating a high performance team Agree and act on a clear, challenging, and significant overall goal for the team Agree on a set of performance standards to which the team will com- mit for the duration of the project Discuss team members' individual strengths and abilities, and assign tasks based on those Develop an effective communication system so that all members are fully aware of team tasks and activities In each of your EDC projects, you will work on a team. Teamwork makes the engineering design process more efficient and productive, and teams are being used more and more frequently in all professions you may enter. The following two factors explain the importance of teamwork. 1. Teams make the engineering design process more efficient and produc- tive : The varied expertise and experience of team members allow the team to approach problems from many perspectives and thereby produce a good variety of possible solutions. A team can divide up work to make the best use of each member’s knowledge and skills. Because team members work interdependently toward shared goals, they can motivate each other to work at the highest level. 2. Teamwork is valued no matter what profession you enter .
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Chapter 12: Creating a High Performance Team 128 Teams have become a fundamental feature of organizations. You will find teams in factories, corporate offices, research laboratories, universities, hospitals, law offices, government agencies, and other places. According to Harvey Robbins and Michael Finley (1995), two authorities on team- work, “The world is teeming with teams”: Work teams, project teams, customer support teams, supplier teams, design teams, planning teams, quality teams. Func- tional teams, and cross-functional teams. ...Advisory teams and action teams. Teams with a structure and a charter, and teams that come together on an ad-hoc basis, do something, and fade back into the woodwork. Senior-level teams and rank-and-file teams. Leader-led teams and leader-less teams (p.7). Teams have become integral to organizations largely because of the accelerat- ing complexity of the decisions that need to be made. According to research- ers Carl Larson and Frank LaFasto (1989): Whatever the problems are that occupy our attention, it is probable that the more significant they are to our collective well being or to the success of our institutions and enter- prises, the more complex they are likely to be. Solving these complex problems demands the integration of many diver- gent points of view and the effective collaboration of many
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edc_2011_12 - PART THREE TEAMWORK AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT...

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