edc_2011_18 - PART FOUR COMMUNICATION CHAPTERS 18 WRITTEN...

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173 PART FOUR COMMUNICATION CHAPTERS 18 WRITTEN AND ORAL COMMUNICATION IN DESIGN 19 CLIENT COMMUNICATION 20 EMAIL AND OTHER E-COMMUNICATION 21 VISUAL COMMUNICATION 22 INSTRUCTIONS 23 PROGRESS REPORTS 24 FINAL REPORTS 25 REVISING FOR CLARITY, CONCISENESS AND CORRECTNESS 26 DOCUMENTING SOURCES—AND AVOIDING PLAGIARISM 27 ORAL DESIGN PRESENTATIONS 28 POSTER PRESENTATIONS 29 WRITING ESSAYS ABOUT DESIGN
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174
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Chapter 18: Written and Oral Communication in Design 175 CHAPTER 18: WRITTEN AND ORAL COMMUNICATION IN DESIGN Chapter outline Similarities between design process and writing process Designing your communication deliverables Writing to explain decisions and conclusions Comparing major written and oral deliverables Key guidelines for written and oral communication in design To communicate effectively in written documents and oral presentations, keep in mind: the audience you are communicating to your purpose in the communication the content you need to communicate the appropriate tone for the communication As Atila Ertas and Jesse C. Jones emphasize in The Engineering Design Pro- cess (1996), “[E]ngineers market their skill through the ability to communi- cate” (p. 470). Without that skill, engineers are shut out of decision-making and, worse, career advancement: Important communications are transmitted in writing so that the meaning can be precisely stated and a record can be established for future reference. Employees that are incapable of preparing clear and understandable written communica- tions tend to be relegated to passive roles in this process. They become information receivers and not information gen- erators and thus gradually find themselves out of the main- stream, out of touch with what is going on, and out of mind when raises and promotions are given (p. 470).
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Chapter 18: Written and Oral Communication in Design 176 Engineers need to be proficient in the following types of communication: Written : reports, proposals, memos, emails, instructions, meeting minutes •O r a l : meetings, design reviews, final presentations •V i s u a l : sketches, drawings, tables, graphs, charts, posters, slides •M a t h e m a t
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edc_2011_18 - PART FOUR COMMUNICATION CHAPTERS 18 WRITTEN...

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