Lab 4 - Lab 4: Toyota Simulation- Lean and Traditional...

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Lab 4: Toyota Simulation- Lean and Traditional Manufacturing February 8, 2011 Megan Farrell Imran Qutubiddin Matt Ricard Alex Weber
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Executive Summary Lean Manufacturing is a production practice that considers the expenditure of resources for any goal other than the creation of value for the end customer to be wasteful, and thus a target for elimination. In addition, Lean Manufacturing has been aggressively applied, and a competitive advantage for Toyota. Lean manufacturing was demonstrated to the class through an application exercise of 2 different simulations of manufacturing Toyota Trucks: the Traditional Manufacturing method and the Lean Manufacturing method. The training environment, or classroom, was set up to allow us learners to practice traditional manufacturing and lean manufacturing under very job-like conditions with equipment that made this simulation feel very ”real.” The first simulation demonstrated the productivity of “traditional” manufacturing known as the “push production.” The participants described this simulation as stressful, chaotic, unorganized, and unsuccessful. Push production does not take into consideration all of the ‘movements’ required to manufacture. There was a lot of productivity loss between the separated and unequal workstations, the managers and conveyances needing to be at each station and no consideration for the customer demand. The productivity was calculated and for the average of 2 simulations, it cost Team "Kill Phil Volume 3" $59.00 to manufacture each car. In addition, there was, on average, 4.5 defective cars, 2.5 late deliveries to the dealership and 8.5 lost sales due to them not being on time. The second production simulated Toyota’s Lean Manufacturing, also known as “pull manufacturing”. The difference between these two approaches is not the goal but the prime approach to achieving it. The environment was reorganized to improve the “flow” or smoothness of the work. The techniques used to improve flow include the “pull” production, by means of a kanban. Kanbans are a concept related to lean and “just in time” production and is a signaling system to trigger action. In the process, Kabans became an effective tool to support the running of the production system as a whole and it proved to be an excellent way for promoting improvements. The outcome was remarkable. Kill Phil Volume 2 reduced the cost to manufacture a car to an average of $8.43 per car. In addition, there were, on average, 0 defects, only 1 late car and 2 lost sales. 2
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Purpose The purpose of this lab is to show what lean manufacturing is and how it is such a huge improvement compared to the traditional manufacturing processes. It allows the students to experience both the traditional and lean manufacturing processes by doing a hands-on simulation of the two methods, and by comparing their results. Procedure
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This note was uploaded on 05/31/2011 for the course IME 223 taught by Professor Bangs during the Spring '08 term at Cal Poly.

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Lab 4 - Lab 4: Toyota Simulation- Lean and Traditional...

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