Lab 7 - L ab 7: M ultiple Activity Cha r t February 24,...

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Lab 7: Multiple Activity Chart February 24, 2011 Megan Farrell
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Executive Summary In optimizing the number of machines per operator, one must be able to create and analyze both Multiple Activity Charts and an economic analysis. Through analyzing the Multiple Activity Analysis, without looking at the charts, the optimal number of machines per operator is 2.6, as shown in Appendix B. Because this is a fractional number and not a whole number, one must calculate an economic analysis and create Multiple Activity Charts to further understand which ratio is optimal. After completely undergoing the economic analysis, there resulted an economical ‘tie’ with two machines per operator costing $11,973 and three machines per operator costing $11,798. Although operating at three machines per operator is technically cheaper than with only two machines, this difference in only $175, which is negligible at this level. Because of this ‘tie’, one should look at the Multiple Activity Charts and take other non-monetary consideration in to account when deciding which plan is optimal. Based on the Multiple Activity Charts in Appendix A, the operator with two machines has to wait 1.5 minutes in each cycle, whereas with three machines the operator is kept busy the whole time and the machines wait. Because money is essentially equivalent in both cases, the optimal plan should be the one where the operator waits and the machines are kept busy at all times. This is because if there is something wrong with the machines or anything else, the operator has some buffer time to fix the problem or find a solution. In addition, the worker won’t get as tired as easily with time to break between each cycle, which in turn should increase productivity. 2
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Purpose The purpose of this lab is intended to familiarize the students with the processes and analysis included in Multiple Activity Charts and Multiple Activity Analysis. This includes making Multiple Activity Charts, understanding the busy member and cycle time, and the economic analysis, to determine the optimum number of machines to be assigned to an operator. Procedure The following steps were performed in conducting this lab: 1. Read the problem statement given on page 4-15. 2. Summarize the relevant data into the table on page 4-16 (Appendix B) 3. Calculate the Optimal number of machines per operator using the formula. 4. Construct Worker-Machine Charts for the case of one machine per operator. 5. Construct Worker-Machine Charts for the case of two machines per operator. 6. Construct Worker-Machine Charts for the case of three machines per operator. 7. Construct Worker-Machine Charts for the case of four machines per operator. 8.
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This note was uploaded on 05/31/2011 for the course IME 223 taught by Professor Bangs during the Spring '08 term at Cal Poly.

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Lab 7 - L ab 7: M ultiple Activity Cha r t February 24,...

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