Lecture 9 Adaptations to Resistance Training

Lecture 9 Adaptations to Resistance Training - Lecture 9:...

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Lecture 9: Adaptations to Resistance Training What are some of the changes in neural control that result in increased strength? What is muscle hypertrophy? What is the difference between transient and chronic hypertrophy? What is the difference between fiber hypertrophy and fiber hyperplasia? What are the different types of activity that can lead to muscle atrophy? What are some of the differences between acute muscle soreness and delayed-onset muscle soreness? Resistance Training and Gains in Muscular Fitness The Neuromuscular system: one of the most responsive systems to training Muscle is very plastic, increasing in size and strength with training and decreasing with immobilization Major neuromuscular adaptations occur with resistance training Formerly associated with weight related sports, resistance training is now used in a variety of sports and non-athletic applications (health and fitness). © BananaStock Muscle size is associated with strength: Gains in muscle strength associated with increased muscle size; decreased strength seen with loss of muscle size Hypertrophy Increase in muscle size Atrophy Decrease in muscle size Other factors play a role in muscle strength Feats of “superhuman” strength
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Neural Control of Strength Gains Recruitment of motor units Increased number of motor units recruited from increased neural drive Synchronicity of motor unit recruitment is improved Increased frequency of discharge from the -motor neuron Morphological changes in the neuromuscular junction Neural Control of Strength Gains Decrease in autogenic inhibition Over stretching of a muscle is detected (by golgi tendon organs or muscle spindles) When the tension exceeds a threshold level, motor neurons in the muscle are inhibited. . Strength can be gained by reducing
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This note was uploaded on 06/01/2011 for the course BIO 117 taught by Professor Manzon during the Spring '11 term at Moraine Valley Community College.

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Lecture 9 Adaptations to Resistance Training - Lecture 9:...

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