part 5 cardiovascular system

part 5 cardiovascular system - Lecture 5: Cardiovascular...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lecture 5: Cardiovascular System Review the structure and function of the heart, vascular system, and blood Explore the role of the cardiovascular system in delivering oxygen and nutrients to active body tissues Discover how the cardiovascular system removes metabolic waste from tissues Major Cardiovascular Functions Delivery of oxygen and other nutrients Removal of carbon dioxide and other metabolic waste Transport of hormones Thermoregulation Maintenance of acid–base balance and overall body fluid balance Immune function The Anatomy of the Human Heart
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Myocardium—The Cardiac Muscle Thickness varies according to the stress placed on chamber walls Left ventricle is the most powerful of chambers and the largest chamber With exercise training the size of the left ventricle increases Intercalated disks in the myocardium allow impulses travel quickly in cardiac muscle and allow it to act as one large muscle fiber; all fibers in the heart contract together as one unit Structural and Functional Characteristics of Skeletal and Cardiac Muscle Coronary Circulation
Background image of page 2
Cardiac Conduction System • Sinoatrial (SA) node • Atrioventricular (AV) node • AV bundle (bundle of His) • Purkinje fibers Intrinsic Conduction System of the Heart Extrinsic Control of the Heart PNS and SNS have antagonistic effects PNS acts through the vagus nerve releasing ACh to decrease heart rate and force of cardiac contraction SNS increases rate of impulse generation and conduction speed, increasing heart rate and force of cardiac contraction Epinephrine and norepinephrine—released from the adrenal medulla as a result of sympathetic stimulation—increase heart rate
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Relative Contribution of Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Nervous Systems to the Rise in Heart Rate During Exercise Adapted from L.B. Rowel , Human Cardiovascular Control . Oxford University Press, 1993. Heart Rate and
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 06/01/2011 for the course BIO 117 taught by Professor Manzon during the Spring '11 term at Moraine Valley Community College.

Page1 / 14

part 5 cardiovascular system - Lecture 5: Cardiovascular...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online