part 11 Training for Sport

part 11 Training for Sport - Lecture 11: Training for Sport...

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Lecture 11: Training for Sport You should be familiar with the sequence of different training levels: Undertraining, acute overload training, overreaching, and overtraining. What are the physical adaptations that may/or may not occur with each level? What level is optimal for achieving performance gains? What is the difference between overreaching and overtraining? What are some of the symptoms of overtraining? As a type of “stress”, how does the effects of overtraining result from the interaction of the nervous, endocrine and immune systems? What is the difference between “tapering” and “detraining”? Under what situations would tapering or detraining be carried out? Lecture 11: Training for Sport When does “optimal training” become “over training”? What are the effects of overtraining and how can you spot them? Influence of Frequency of Swim Training on (a) Blood Lactate Concentrations and (b) Heart Rates During 25 Week of Training From the beginning of week 5 through the end of week 10 group 1 trained once per day whereas group 2 trained twice per day.
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Outline Factors involved in training, including volume and intensity Levels of training: undertraining, acute overload training, overreaching, and overtraining Overtraining syndrome Tapering Detraining (continued) Individual Adaptations to Training A person’s rate of adaptation and response to training is genetically limited and cannot be forced beyond his or her body’s capacity for development. Each individual responds differently to the same training stress. Factors involved in training (volume/intensity) • Training volume • Training intensity
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Undertraining: Acute overload: Overreaching Overtraining: Model of the Continuum of Training Stages in a Periodized Training Mesocycle Adapted, by permission, from L.E. Armstrong and J.L. VanHeest, 2002, “The unknown mechanism of the overtraining syndrome,” Sports Medicine 32(1): 185-209. Optimal Training and Periodization Optimal training involves following a model that incorporates the principles of periodization Well designed training models utilize progressive overload, but must be careful not to push the body beyond its ability to adapt (overtraining)
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This note was uploaded on 06/01/2011 for the course BIO 117 taught by Professor Manzon during the Spring '11 term at Moraine Valley Community College.

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part 11 Training for Sport - Lecture 11: Training for Sport...

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