notes 14 - Examples Submitted by gfj100 on Wed, 11/11/2009...

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Examples Submitted by gfj100 on Wed, 11/11/2009 - 10:07 Example 1 The probability of a student getting an A in this course is 0.25 (Not True!) and the probability of getting a B is 0.30 (again Not True!). What is the probability of getting an A or a B? According to Rule 4.a , P(A or B) = P(A) + P(B) = 0.25 + 0.30 = 0.55. In this example events A and B are mutually exclusive since a student cannot get both an A and a B for a course, but instead can only get one grade. Take a look at the Venn diagram example below: Example 2 The probability of a student in this course getting an A is 0.25; the probability of being female is 0.60. What is the probability of getting an A or being female? . ...... Can't say? Well, we could add probabilities in example 1 since the two events were mutually exclusive, but in this example getting an A and being female may both occur. So we just cannot simply add the probability of one event to the probability of the other event - if we did we would be counting twice the
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notes 14 - Examples Submitted by gfj100 on Wed, 11/11/2009...

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