notes 16 - is nothing in A B , and thus: P ( A B ) = 0 P (...

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Submitted by gfj100 on Wed, 11/11/2009 - 10:13 Given P ( A ) = 0.6, P ( B ) = 0.5, and P ( A B ) = 0.2. Find P ( ). Work out your answer first, then click the graphic to compare answers. Find P ( A ). Work out your answer first, then click the graphic to compare answers. Find P ( B ∩ ). Work out your answer first, then click the graphic to compare answers. Find P ( A B ). Work out your answer first, then click the graphic to compare answers. Independent Versus Mutually Exclusive Remark: Independent is very different from mutually exclusive. In fact, mutually exclusive events are dependent. If A and B are mutually exclusive events, there
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Unformatted text preview: is nothing in A B , and thus: P ( A B ) = 0 P ( A ) P ( B ) From an urn with 6 red balls and 4 blue balls, two balls are picked randomly without replacement. Find the probability that both balls picked are red. Work out your answer first, then click the graphic to compare answers. Let A and B be the following two happy events. A : get a job, B : buy a new car. It is a given that P ( A ) = 0.9, P ( B ) = 0.7. What is the probability of double happiness: that you get a job and buy a new car? In other words, we want to find P ( A B )....
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This note was uploaded on 05/31/2011 for the course STAT 200 taught by Professor Andyregards during the Spring '11 term at World College.

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notes 16 - is nothing in A B , and thus: P ( A B ) = 0 P (...

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