2010-09-30 -- Adventures in Bibliography (1)

2010-09-30 -- Adventures in Bibliography (1) - Adventures...

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Unformatted text preview: Adventures in Bibliography September 30, 2010 History 300-002 University of South Carolina Citation Styles Modern Language Association (MLA) Chicago Manual of Style (Chicago) Be Consistent!!! Theres no single correct format for citations and footnotes Pick one for your paper and stick with it Citations should convey: Author of source Name of source Provenance of source (year and location) Where in the source info was found (page #) To emphasize these I will refer to these disciplines as the single term cyberscience . [1] Keller emphasized those commonalities to great effect, illuminating how molecular biologists and their precursors interpreted the ideas of computing, communication, and organization and then applied them to their own work. For instance, she points to the conflation between [Claude Shannons original notion of] information and instruction that became, after Watson and Crick, so conspicuous and that proved so productive in the literature of molecular biology; and she highlights how Jacques Monod and Franois Jacob embraced the language of cybernetics to model genetic regulation. [2] [1] Evelyn Fox Keller, Refiguring Life (New York: Columbia Univ. Press, 1995), 85. [2] Keller, Refiguring Life , 95-96. Keller regarded cyberscience and molecular biology as antiparallel schools of thought: Cyberscience and molecular biology may have been products of the same historical moment, but with respect to their models of causal structure, they were running on two separate tracks, side by side but in opposite directions: while the first one was busy using the organism to illustrate a new kind of machine, the other was seeking to model the organism after the machines of yesteryear. (Keller, 97) That year Forsythe wrote, Enough is known already of the diverse applications of computing for us to recognize the birth of a coherent body of technique, which I call computer science. Whether computers are used for engineering design, medical data processing, composing music or other purposes, the structure of computing is much the same. [1] Forsythes inclusion of biomedical computing in his vision for computer science became manifest in his hard-fought but ultimately unsuccessful 1962-1963 attempt to convince the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to grant Stanford about $1 million towards supporting an IBM 7090 that would be used primarily by biologists. [2] [1] George E. Forsythe, Educational implications of the computer revolution. George E....
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2010-09-30 -- Adventures in Bibliography (1) - Adventures...

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