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Animal Abuse in Factory Farms

Animal Abuse in Factory Farms - ANIMAL ABUSE IN FACTORY...

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ANIMAL ABUSE IN FACTORY FARMS 1 Animal Abuse in Factory Farms Jeannette Bravo DeVry University English 135 Instructor: David Layton February 20, 2011
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ANIMAL ABUSE IN FACTORY FARMS 2 Abstract Animal farming is the practice of raising animals indoors, where they never see the sunlight. Factory farming is not a healthy place for animals to live because they face incredible pain and suffering, these factories do not see animals as living things, and animals live in unhealthy conditions. In these types of farms, animals do not get the treatment they are supposed to receive. Every day of their life, animals are being fed with antibiotics, and their genes are manipulated that way they can reproduce bigger thighs and breasts. The people that are against factory faming believe that this is the cause why there are so many diseases today and they do not agree with the way animals are being treated. While those who are in favor of this type of farming say it is okay because animals have no feelings and it gives many people an employment.
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ANIMAL ABUSE IN FACTORY FARMS 3 Animal Abuse in Factory Farms When people think about animals they usually picture animals living happily out in the fields, but what people do not know is that animals do not live out in the field like they say in stories. Animals live in their life miserably in dark and overcrowded farms called “factory farms.” Factory farms are not healthy for animals because animals live in terrible conditions and factory farms do not see animals as living things. Factory farm animals are not the only ones that get harmed, humans do too. Factory farming produces demonstrable harms to people, such as hormone imbalance, spread of diseases, contamination of land and water, and increased greenhouse emissions, but like other issues, better alternatives exist. Factory farming began in the 1920’s, when vitamins A and D were discovered. Once these vitamins were added to feed the animals, animals no longer needed to live outdoors in the sun to grow. With that done, animals started living indoors in large farm that operates as a factory and are known as “factory farms.” Having so many animals living indoors was the cause of many diseases, spreading around. Fortunately, the development of antibiotics helped reduce these diseases and that is when farmers thought about increasing their productivity and reduce operation costs by utilizing machines and assembly-line machinery. The main purpose of factory farming is to produce as much as they can at a very low cost. First of all, animals that live in factory farms live in terrible conditions. Every day animals are being fed with antibiotics to reward them for overcrowded, stressful and unsanitary living conditions. About 13.5 million pounds of antibiotics are being added either to the animal`s feed or water. Also, animals in animal factories are being fed with ingredients that are definitely not the food that they are naturally supposed to eat. The types of food animals are being fed with contain meat of their same specie, feathers, hair, skin, and blood. They also
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