C_Fern - 1 Sexual Growth and Reproduction of the C-Fern...

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Sexual Growth and Reproduction of the C-Fern Plant Introduction: Gametophytes play a very large role in the fern life cycle. The mature gametophyte produces eggs in hermaphrodite gametangia and sperm in the male gametangia. When water is present, the male releases sperm to fertilize the egg in the C- fern. Once and embryo is formed, it matures into a sporophyte. When the sporophyte grows roots and leaves they become independent of their gametophyte parent. The larger amount of heterozygous breeding in ferns is based upon cross-fertilizing mating systems (Hamilton & Lloyd, 1991). We notice that in the mutant strain of c-ferns there are no males present; only hermaphrodites. From these observations we hypothesize that the m- strain does not produce a hormone signal, which would allow them to create a male formation. Also, mutants do not produce the hormone and the mutant stand will not respond if the hormone is added. We hope to find out if the lack of hormone is actually the cause of no males being present in the mutant strand of the c-fern. The main population difference in the wild type and mutant strands of the c-fern are that the wild type have males and hermaphrodites present. The mutant strand only has hermaphrodites present. For the first hypothesis we predict that when we add the mutant filtrate into the wild type dish there would be no hormones produced. For the second hypothesis we predict that when we add the wild type filtrate into the mutant dish it will not respond to the hormone being introduced. 1
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Materials and Methods: In order to test our hypotheses, we divided the different dishes up evenly to test each situation for the hypothesize. For the first hypothesis, the m-strand does not produce the hormone; we put the m-filtrate into a wild type dish. We did this in nine different Petri dishes. There were three different concentrations of filtrate, and three different dishes of each filtrate. Three were a 1.2% filtrate of mutant, three were an 11% filtrate of mutant, and the remaining three were 50% mutant filtrate. Then for the second hypothesis, the m-strand does not respond to the hormone, we put the wild type filtrate into a mutant dish. We did this in nine different Petri dishes as well. There were three different concentrations of filtrate and three different dishes of each filtrate for this
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This note was uploaded on 06/02/2011 for the course BMZ LAB taught by Professor Labassistant during the Fall '08 term at Miami University.

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C_Fern - 1 Sexual Growth and Reproduction of the C-Fern...

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