FAP5_Lecture_Personality%2520D-O

FAP5_Lecture_Personality%2520D-O - Comer, Fundamentals of...

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Unformatted text preview: Comer, Fundamentals of Abnormal Psychology , 5e Chapter 13 Slides & Handouts by Karen Clay Rhines, Ph.D. 1 Chapter 13 Chapter 13 Personality Disorders Personality Disorders Comer, Fundamentals of Abnormal Psychology , 5e Chapter 13 2 Personality Personality What is personality? Personality is a unique and long-term pattern of inner experience and outward behavior Personality tends to be consistent and is often described in terms of traits These traits may be inherited, learned, or both Personality is also flexible, allowing us to adapt to new environments For those with personality disorders, however, that flexibility is usually missing Comer, Fundamentals of Abnormal Psychology , 5e Chapter 13 3 Personality Disorders Personality Disorders What is a personality disorder? An inflexible pattern of inner experience and outward behavior This pattern is seen in most interactions, differs from the experiences and behaviors usually expected, and continues for years Comer, Fundamentals of Abnormal Psychology , 5e Chapter 13 4 INSERT TABLE 13-1 DSM: PERSONALITY DISORDER Comer, Fundamentals of Abnormal Psychology , 5e Chapter 13 5 Classifying Personality Disorders Classifying Personality Disorders Personality disorders typically become recognizable in adolescence or early adulthood Generally, the affected person does not regard his or her behavior as undesirable or problematic It has been estimated that 9% to 13% of all adults may have a personality disorder Comer, Fundamentals of Abnormal Psychology , 5e Chapter 13 6 Classifying Personality Disorders Classifying Personality Disorders Personality disorders are diagnosed on Axis II of the DSM-IV-TR Those diagnosed with personality disorders are often also diagnosed with an Axis I disorder This relationship is called comorbidity Axis II disorders may predispose people to develop an Axis I disorder, or Axis I disorders may set the stage for Axis II disorders, or some biological condition may set the stage for both! Whatever the reason, research indicates that the presence of a personality disorder complicates and reduces a persons chances for a successful recovery Comer, Fundamentals of Abnormal Psychology , 5e Chapter 13 7 Classifying Personality Disorders Classifying Personality Disorders The DSM-IV-TR identifies ten personality disorders and separates these into three categories or clusters: Odd or eccentric behavior Paranoid, schizoid, and schizotypal personality disorders Dramatic, emotional, or erratic behavior Antisocial, borderline, narcissistic, and histrionic personality...
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FAP5_Lecture_Personality%2520D-O - Comer, Fundamentals of...

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