2005_campbl29

2005_campbl29 - Chapter 29: Plant Diversity I: How Plants...

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Chapter 29: Plant Diversity I: How Plants Colonized Land
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Overview of Plant Phylogeny Chara, the outlier to the plant phylogeny, is a green alga Naked seed Chamber- contained seed
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More Detail Don’t worry about dates
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Nonvascular Plants Nonvascular plants also lack woody tissue, seeds, flowers, and fruits Note majority are mosses
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Vascular Plants Not all seed plants have flowers and fruits Seedless plants also lack flowers and fruits
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Cellulose-Synthesis “These distinctly rose-shaped arrays of proteins are found only in land plants and charophycean algae, suggesting their close kinship.” p. 574, Campbell & Reece (2005) Similarities in peroxisomes, flagellated sperm, and cell division also link charophyscean algae with green plants.
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From Alga to Plants
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Charaphycena Algae
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Scenario for Algae to Plants The ancestor of all plants was a green alga Green algae have plant-like chloroplasts, plant- like cell walls, and a plant-like energy storage molecule (starch)… etc. The ancestor of plants probably was a green alga that lived whole or partially in very shallow water, perhaps susceptible to periodic drying up Those algae that could continue to metabolize despite not being completely covered with water presumably possessed a selective advantage— including shading those algae restricted to water
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This note was uploaded on 06/03/2011 for the course BIO 113 taught by Professor Swenson during the Spring '08 term at Ohio State.

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2005_campbl29 - Chapter 29: Plant Diversity I: How Plants...

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