2005_campbl50

2005_campbl50 - Chapter 50: An Introduction to Ecology and...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 50: An Introduction to Ecology and the Biosphere
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Ecology "The scientific study of the interactions between organisms and their environments is called ecology.“ "The trouble with ecology is that you never know where to start because everything affects everything else." Robert A. Heinlein (from Farmer in the Sky )
Background image of page 2
Ecology "As an area of scientific study, ecology incorporates the hypothetico-deductive approach, using observations and experiments to test hypothetical explanations of ecological phenomena. . . . ecologists often face extraordinary challenges in their research because of the complexity of their questions, the diversity of their subjects, and the large expanses of time and space over which studies must often be conducted. Ecology is also challenging because of its multidisciplinary nature; ecological questions form a continuum with those from other areas of biology, including genetics, evolution, physiology, and behavior, as well as those from other sciences, such as chemistry, physics, geology, and meteorology." (p. 1061, Campbell, 1996)
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Hypothetico-Deductive
Background image of page 4
Ecology "Ecology concerns itself with the interrelationships of living organisms, plant or animal, and their environments; these are studied with a view to discovering the principles which govern the relationships. That such principles exist is a basic assumption —and an act of faith—of the ecologist. His field of inquiry is no less wide than the totality of the living conditions of plants and animals under observation, their systematic position, their reactions to the environment and to each other, and the physical and chemical nature of their inanimate surroundings . . . It must be admitted that the ecologist is something of a chartered libertine. He roams at will over the legitimate preserves of the plant and animal biologist, the taxonomist, the physiologist, [the microbiologist,] the behaviorist, the meteorologist, the geologist, the physicist, the chemist and even the sociologist; he poaches from all these and from other established and respected disciplines. It is indeed a major problem for the ecologist, in his own interest, to set bounds to his divagations [wanderings/digressions]." (p. 5, Kormondy, 1996 quoting Macfadyen, 1957) Ecology is a pain in the butt (S.T.A., circa: this past weekend)
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
“#962. Libertine. -- N. libertine; voluptuary &c. 954 a; rake, debauchee, loose fish, rip, rakehell[obs3], fast man; intrigant[obs3], gallant, seducer, fornicator, lecher, satyr, goat, whoremonger, paillard[obs3], adulterer, gay deceiver, Lothario,
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 06/03/2011 for the course BIO 113 taught by Professor Swenson during the Spring '08 term at Ohio State.

Page1 / 28

2005_campbl50 - Chapter 50: An Introduction to Ecology and...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online