campbl22 - Can you read this If you cant read this then you...

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Can you read this? If you can’t read this then you really ought to move to a new seat!
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How about now? If you can’t read this then you really ought to move to a new seat!
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Darwinian Evolution The material we will cover in Biology 114 is very much different from that covered in Biology 113, particularly in terms of the perspective and approach of those who engage in these difference aspects of biology. It is almost as though biology consists of two very different sciences, a reductionist science that seeks to emulate chemistry or physics (113), and a much more philosophical science that is interested as much in the subtleties of history as it is in rigors of the more exact physical sciences (114). This is not to say that we will not be learning real science in Biology 114, but instead that the general approach of learning that we will employ in Biology 114 will be somewhat different from that of Biology 113. In Biology 113, basically, you sought to understand how a cell works. Here we will deal with such squishy topics as why it is the cells that we observe exist at all. Keep an open mind and study hard. By the end of this term you will have gained an appreciation of the most important concept in Biology: Darwinian evolution.
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Darwinian Evolution "The process of evolution can be summarized in three sentences: Genes mutate. Individuals are selected. Populations evolve."
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Charles Darwin
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Major Goals of this Chapter Get a Feeling for what it means for two organisms to be Evolutionarily Related Get a feeling for what is meant by “Selection” (a.k.a., “Natural Selection”) and by “Darwinian Evolution” Get a feeling for how we infer that organisms are evolutionarily related
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1 st Major Goal of Chapter 22 Get a Feeling for what it means for two organisms to be Evolutionarily Related Hint: It means that the two organisms are related by Blood ! Individuals from different Species are just very distantly related Cousins ! ( All of Diversity of Life) Just as You and I are, only even more distantly related
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Cousins
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A Cladogram: A Graphed Phylogeny
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Relatedness of All Cellular Organisms
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Relatedness of All Eukaryotes
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Relatedness of All Plants
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Relatedness of All Fungi
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Relatedness of All Animals
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2 nd Major Goal of Chapter Get a feeling for what is meant by “Selection” (a.k.a., “Natural Selection”) and “Darwinian Evolution” History of Evolutionary Thinking Malthus’ Logic Mayr’s Logical Summary of Darwinian Evolution and Natural Selection Natural Selection and Adaptation Artificial Selection Observation of Selection (in particularly, as a consequence of “Man the Modifier of Environments”)
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History of Evolutionary Thinking
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History of Evolutionary Thinking Aristotle , 384-322 B.C.E., Scala Naturae (biology) Natural Theology (understanding nature for the sake of understanding the glory of creator’s universe) Carolus Linnaeus , 1707-1778, Taxonomy (organizing organisms by phenotypic similarity) (biology) Georges Cuvier , 1769-1832, Catastrophism (e.g.,
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