campbl54 - Chaparral flora prevails in California and in...

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Unformatted text preview: Chaparral flora prevails in California and in much of the Southwestern United States. chaparral [is] a general term for the various types of brushes, shrubs, and small trees that blanket the landscape of the Western United States. Typically fires in areas of chaparral kill most of the surface biomass, leaving the roots, lignotubers, and seeds below the ground unharmed. Many of the species of chaparral are dependent upon heat from fire for scarification, the cracking open of seed coats necessary for germination. Charred wood has also been discovered to play a vital role in cueing germination of a recently burned area. Charate, the burned organic material from plant and tree matter, provides a chemical cue for dormant seeds to begin germination. http://www.micro.utexas.edu/ courses/mcmurry/spring98/10/jerry.html The leaves on chaparral plants contain many flammable substances, such as oils, fats, resins, alcohols, and terpens that actually encourage fire. Chaparral plants grow and spread very quickly, taking advantage of recently burned areas. The roots of these plants contain nitrogen fixing bacteria which enable them to take over a burned area without waiting for nitrogen bacteria to regenerate the soil. There is a constant recycle of old plants and new ones in chaparral communities because of their rapid growth rate, making it difficult for foreign plants to invade an area. http://www.micro.utexas.edu/courses/mcmurry/spring98/10/jerry.html The Douglas-fir trees in the Pacific Northwest use fire in a different way than chaparral. Actually, Douglas-firs don't use fire at all; they are extremely resistant to fire....
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This note was uploaded on 06/03/2011 for the course BIO 113 taught by Professor Swenson during the Spring '08 term at Ohio State.

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campbl54 - Chaparral flora prevails in California and in...

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