nester08 - Chapter 8: Bacterial Genetics Important Point:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 8: Bacterial Genetics
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Important Point:
Background image of page 2
Bacterial Genetics “Acquiring genes through gene transfer provides new genetic information to microorganisms, which may allow them to survive changing environments.” “The major source of variation within a bacterial species is mutation.” “In mutations, usually only a single gene changes at any one time.” “In contrast, gene transfer results in many genes being transferred simultaneously, giving the recipient cell much more additional genetic information.”
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Bacterial Genetics Overview Most bacteria are haploid which means that there is no such thing as dominance-recessive relationships among bacterial alleles. Bacteria don’t have sex in the animal/plant sense of sex (i.e., mating followed by recombination of whole genomes). Instead, bacteria acquire DNA from other bacteria through three distinct mechanisms: Transformation Transduction Conjugation This DNA may or may not then recombine into the recipient’s genome. We use phrases like “Lateral” or “Horizontal” Gene Transfer to describe these sexual interactions. Bacterial DNA is also subject to mutation, damage (not the same thing as mutation), and natural selection.
Background image of page 4
Wild Type refers to the microorganism as isolated from the wild. A mutated microorganism that has lost a metabolic function, particularly an ability to synthesize a specific growth factor, is called an Auxotroph. The wild-type parent to an auxotroph is called a Prototroph. A Mutation is found in a gene; a mutant is an
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 06/03/2011 for the course MCB 205 taught by Professor Abedon during the Spring '11 term at Ohio State.

Page1 / 28

nester08 - Chapter 8: Bacterial Genetics Important Point:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online