Nanomaterials and the Environment

Nanomaterials and - Nanomaterials and the Environment Professor Michael H Depledge DSc Chair of Environment and Human Health NANOTECHNOLOGY 10

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Nanomaterials and the Environment Professor Michael H. Depledge DSc. Chair of Environment and Human Health
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NANOTECHNOLOGY 10 HYDROGEN ATOMS IN A ROW MEASURE 1 nm
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Diagnosing Human Diseases General signs and symptoms Specific biochem, physiol. & behavioural tests Tissue pathology & specific diagnostic tests Diagnosis & treatment response? General biomarkers More specific biomarkers Diagnostic biomarkers “Response” biomarkers
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“Diagnosing” Ecological Impacts General signs and abnormalities Specific biochem, physiol. & behavioural tests Tissue pathology & specific diagnostic tests “Diagnosis” & management response? General biomarkers More specific biomarkers “Response” biomarkers Diagnostic biomarkers
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Complexity of behaviour in natural systems pH 2 pH 4 Agglomeration of Iron oxide nanoparticles Images courtesy of Jamie Lead and Mohammed Baalousha, University of Birmingham 100 nm 400 nm 100 nm 100 nm pH 2 pH 4 pH 6 pH 8 + Humic Acids 100 nm pH 4 pH 4 100 nm - Humic Acids
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-60 -40 -20 0 20 40 60 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 pH Zeta potential FeO(OH) 100ppm FeO(OH) 100ppm + HA 5ppm Physico chemical behaviour of nanoparticles in natural systems: the influence of biotic and biotic factors. Abiotic factors include: pH, ionic strength, organic matter etc. . Implications : Environmental Exposure: agglomeration, form, surface chemistry Bioavailability and direct toxicity Dissolution and indirect toxicity (metal nanoparticles) Test relevance
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Nanomaterial Complexity of structure, and behaviour in natural systems Abiotic factors Biotic factors Uncertainty in Hazard Assessment (LOEC,NOEC, PNEC) Using standard tests Uncertainty in Exposure Modelling (PEC) High propagated uncertainty in Risk Assessment (datascarcity) (PEC: PNEC) Complexity and ignorance (data scarcity) leads to risk uncertainty
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100 nm pH 4 + Humic Acids - Humic Acids Structure - Activity Relationships Asbestos High aspect ratio (>20 m length <3 m width, biopersistent) Fibre / pathogenicity paradigm Respiratory exposure (Source – Pathway – Receptor) Re ad across to other Fibres e.g. CNT 100 nm pH 4
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After Neal (2008) Ecotoxicology (in press) Development of conceptual model of exposure and interaction to drive environmental risk assessment Gram ve bacterium NP NP Interaction Repulsion Dissolution Abiotic modification (e.g. Biotic Ligand Model) Source–pathway–receptor connectivity Endpoint selection I ntrinsic properties Conceptual model development Speciation, bioavailability Boundaries for quantitative risk assessment
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Problem formulation for environmental risk assessment of novel materials Problem Formulation Prioritisation Risk Risk Quantification Risk Significance Options Appraisal Risk Management, Regulation Hazard Exposure Probability of harm occurring Appropriate Controls
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Unpacking problem formulation and prioritisation : the when of risk assessment Risk Problem Formulation Prioritisation Conceptual model development Structure – activity Read across Intrinsic properties Life Cycle Analysis Exposure model Nanomaterial Endpoint selection Risk Quantification „Justifying the Intent‟ Functionalised Nanomaterial
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This note was uploaded on 06/03/2011 for the course ENVR 202 taught by Professor Carlarne during the Spring '11 term at South Carolina.

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Nanomaterials and - Nanomaterials and the Environment Professor Michael H Depledge DSc Chair of Environment and Human Health NANOTECHNOLOGY 10

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