Research Strategies 2.17

Research Strategies 2.17 - ResearchStrategies...

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Research Strategies Research Strategies Research Methods PSYC E226 2/17/10
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Learning Objectives Learning Objectives Learn five research strategies and the  kind of questions that apply to each Know the definitions of internal and  external validity Become familiar with three categories of  threats to internal validity Become familiar with three categories of  threats to external validity Understand the relationship of validity to  research strategy 
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Research Strategy Research Strategy Consider three research questions: How many calories do second graders eat  during breakfast? Is there a relationship between the quality  of a child’s breakfast and the level of the  child’s academic performance? Does improving the quality of a child’s  breakfast cause an improvement in the  level of the child’s academic  performance?
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Experiment vs. Observation Experiment vs. Observation Research studies can be done in two  ways: Experiments are where the researcher  actively changes something to see if there  is a difference between groups Observation is where the researcher finds  two existing groups and studies the  difference between them
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Research Strategies Research Strategies There are Five major research strategies  we will cover in this course: Descriptive Research:   Covers only one variable  at a time Correlational Research:  Addresses the degree to  which two  variables  are related Quasi-experimental Research:  Looks at one  group of participants at two times Non-experimental Research:  Looks at two  groups one time Experimental Design:   Like non- or quasi- experimental research, but experimental 
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Descriptive Research Strategy Descriptive Research Strategy Look at just one variable at a time Always observational Typically basic research Examples:  How many words does a 6-month old  infant understand? How many hours do university students  sleep each night?
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Correlational Research Strategy Correlational Research Strategy In order to find out how two variables  relate, we collect information about  both from each participant Example: Do students who study longer  get better grades?  We would plot each student’s hours  studied on one axis, grades on the other Look for how closely the dots stick  together, if they form a line
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Graphing data Graphing data
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Correlation IS NOT Causation Even if we find that people who  studied more got higher grades, this  does not mean that it was the  cause   of the higher grades To show causation, we need: To show that studying came  before  the 
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This note was uploaded on 06/03/2011 for the course PSYC E226 taught by Professor Smolowitz during the Spring '10 term at South Carolina.

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Research Strategies 2.17 - ResearchStrategies...

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