Ethics in Research 1.25

Ethics in Research - Ethics in Research Click to edit Master subtitle style Research Methods PSYC E226 Learning Objectives Learn history of human

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Click to edit Master subtitle style Ethics in Research Research Methods PSYC E226 1/25/10
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Learning Objectives Learn history of human subjects ethical violations Learn major tenets of research ethics in psychology Understand what deception research is and how it can be done ethically Know what a consent form is and its major parts Understand the purpose and responsibilities of an Institutional Review Board Become familiar with ethics for animal
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What are research ethics? l An agreed upon set of rules for being responsible to research participants and other psychologists l Includes both rules about collecting data and reporting it, covering steps of the research process l When in doubt, always consult a colleague
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History of Ethics in Research During WWII, Nazis experimented on prisoners in concentration camps, typically using painful or deadly methods. Led by Dr. Josepf Mangele, they aimed to prove themselves a superior race. Some examples were: Twin studies including blood draws that would leave them to bleed to death Placing people in ice cold vats to see the lowest temperatures humans could survive – including temperatures too low to survive
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The Nuremberg Code This led to the writing of the Nuremberg Code, an ethical code to govern research. Voluntary consent of participants Experiments are designed to help society Avoid all unnecessary physical and mental suffering No experiment should be done with an expectation that death may occur unless a physician also is a subject The scientist must be prepared to terminate the study if he finds that it may lead to injury,
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The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment From 1932 until 1972, a research study was conducted in order to understand the natural course of syphilis. Participants were 600 Black men, 399 of whom had syphilis. Most were poor, rural men with little education Participants were never told what the study was about, but they were told they were being treated for “bad blood” The participants were not treated for syphilis, but kept in the study for 40 years without being referred for medical care.
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In 1979, seven years after the end of the Tuskegee study, the Belmont Report was written. Main provisions are: Participants should give consent. Those who cannot should be protected. Researcher must minimize risks and maximize
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This note was uploaded on 06/03/2011 for the course PSYC E226 taught by Professor Smolowitz during the Spring '10 term at South Carolina.

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Ethics in Research - Ethics in Research Click to edit Master subtitle style Research Methods PSYC E226 Learning Objectives Learn history of human

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