Streptomycetes Lab

Streptomycetes Lab - A Study of the Antibiotic Production...

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A Study of the Antibiotic Production and Resistive Quality of Streptomycetes Bacteria Collected and Cultured From Two Distinct Soil Samples Found on the Loyola Marymount University Campus. Elyse Walp Peter Joyce Scott Nelson Angel Engh February 21, 2008 BIOL112 Section 15 TA: Jennifer Woo
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Background Streptomycetes are a species of bacteria, commonly found in soil, that closely resemble fungi in both function and form. Similarly to fungi, Streptomycetes have a filamentous phenotype, where colonies are powdery rather than shiny. Streptomycetes’ hyphae grow to form large masses called mycelia. Steptomycetes also form spores when introduced to heat. This characteristic makes it more resilient than the typical species of bacteria and therefore easier to select for. Streptomycetes are known for their manufacturing of common antibiotics including erythromycin, streptomycin, and tetracycline, but different strains of Streptomycetes produce different antibiotics. Hypothesis The sample collected near the greenhouse behind the Sullivan dormitory (Sample 2) will have more Streptomycetes colonies than the sample collected in front of East Quad (Sample 1) due to the fact that it was a moist area. If we collected soil samples with Streptomycetes, these plates will produce powerful antibiotics that inhibit various other bacteria such as, E. coli , P. aeruginosa , S. aureus , and B. cereus . These antibiotics produced by the strains of Streptomycetes collected in Sample 2 will be strong enough to inhibit the growth of the various other strains of Streptomycetes that were collected in each of the two samples, and also strong enough to not be inhibited be known antibiotics including Tetracycline, Ampicillin, Streptomycin, and Neomycin. Because we assume that the bacteria collected are a species of Streptomycetes, which are Gram positive bacteria, we expected them to test positively for peptidoglycan.
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Procedure We first collected the two samples. Sample 1 was taken from in front of East Quad in a dry, more dusty area. Sample 2 was collected from moist soil located in front of the greenhouse behind the Sullivan dormitory. Then they were dried at temperatures above 37 ° C. This high temperature selected against other bacteria and in contrast, for Streptomycetes . Next, serial dilutions were performed for each of the two samples in order to achieve individual colonies of bacteria. We then counted and cocumented colonies for each plate of the serial dilution where there were between 30 and 300 colonies. Promising colonies, those who exhibited physical qualities of Streptomycetes such as a powdery and rubbery texture, were further isolated and streaked onto separate plates. Using these isolates, assays were established to first test the effect
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This note was uploaded on 04/04/2008 for the course BIOL 112 taught by Professor Lum during the Spring '08 term at Loyola Marymount.

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Streptomycetes Lab - A Study of the Antibiotic Production...

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