Fast Plant Lab - Walp 1 Introduction Background: Brassica...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Walp 1 Introduction Background: Brassica rapa (B. rapa) is a form of wild mustard from the plant family Cruciferae which also includes mustards, radishes, and cabbages. These crops are known for their nutritional value. Dr. Paul Williams was the person to work with these ‘fast plants’ and select characteristics that were most useful in a classroom or laboratory setting. He bred the plants for many years, always selecting for the shortest flowering time, the most rapid seed maturations, and plants with no seed dormancy required. He selected for their ability to produce seeds even at high planting density, and also a small plant size. Another selection made was made to ensure their ability to grow under continuous florescent light and in a standard potting soil. The Fast Plants that we used had a life cycle of 5 weeks. This time period is 1/5 of the time of the life cycle of the original plants the Fast Plants were bred from. Our section dealt with varying the concentration of NaCl. By doing this we are performing a single variable experiment and are able to examine the effect chemical stress has on our Fast Plants. Salinity has a negative effect on plant growth when too much gathers near the roots. When there is excess salt in the root zone, water uptake is hindered and thus plant growth is hindered. Hypothesis: We expect that extreme NaCl concentration, 320 mM NaCl, will not be beneficial to the growth of our fast plants and will result in shorter stem height. The more moderate concentrations of NaCl, 0 mM, 40 mM, 80 mM, and 160 mM, will promote the healthiest plants with longer stems and more leaves.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Walp 2 Null Hypothesis: We expect that extreme NaCl concentration, 320 mM NaCl, will have no effect on the growth of our fast plants where height or leaf count is concerned. The more moderate concentrations of NaCl, 0 mM, 40 mM, 80 mM, and 160 mM, will also have no marked effect on our plants and we will see no change in height or leave count. Materials and Method For this experiment we used a total of 15 fast plant seeds, 5 salsa cups, vermiculite, Peter’s solution, peat moss, and five concentrations of NaCl: [0], [40], [80], [160], and [320]. We began by preparing 5 of the salsa cups for planting. We poked a small hole in the bottom of each cup and then placed a wick inside the hole. Three pebbles were added to the bottom of the cup and on top of that the potting mix was added. We then moistened the soil with the nutrient solution until it dripped freeing from the wick. Three seeds were added to each of the five cups and then covered with a small amount of vermiculite. Each cup was then watered again and then placed back on the tray in the reservoir. Each pot was labeled with the set concentration for easy reference. The pots were left to sit under a constant light source and then watered with 2 ml of the correct concentration of NaCl on days 3, 7, and 14. After three weeks of growing the pots
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/04/2008 for the course BIOL 112 taught by Professor Lum during the Spring '08 term at Loyola Marymount.

Page1 / 10

Fast Plant Lab - Walp 1 Introduction Background: Brassica...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online