Ch31-p097 - the(generally smaller current in one of the resistors Resonant frequencies f are computed with ω = 2 π f Reducing capacitor and

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97. Reading carefully, we note that the driving frequency of the source is permanently set at the resonance frequency of the initial circuit (with switches open); it is set at ω d = 1/ LC = 1.58 × 10 4 rad/s and does not correspond to the resonance frequency once the switches are closed. In our table, below, C eq is in µ F, f is in kHz, and R eq and Z are in . Steady state conditions are assumed in calculating the current amplitude (which is in amperes); this I is the current through the source (or through the inductor), as opposed to
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Unformatted text preview: the (generally smaller) current in one of the resistors. Resonant frequencies f are computed with ω = 2 π f . Reducing capacitor and resistor combinations is explained in chapters 26 and 28, respectively. switch (a) C eq ( µ F) (b) f (kHz) (c) R eq ( Ω ) (d) Z( Ω ) (e) I (A) S 1 4.00 1.78 12.0 19.8 0.605 S 2 5.00 1.59 12.0 22.4 0.535 S 3 5.00 1.59 6.0 19.9 0.603 S 4 5.00 1.59 4.0 19.4 0.619...
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This note was uploaded on 06/03/2011 for the course PHY 2049 taught by Professor Any during the Spring '08 term at University of Florida.

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