Stomata Lab - A Comparison of the Differences in Stomata...

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A Comparison of the Differences in Stomata Density of the species Ricinus communis Found in Two Locations of Varying Sunlight on the Loyola Marymount Campus. Angel Engh Peter Joyce Scott Nelson Elyse Walp April 3, 2008 BIOL112 Section 15 TA: Jennifer Woo
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Introduction Background The stomata of leaves are responsible for the gas exchange of the plant. CO 2(g) is allowed to enter the plant and H 2 O (g) and O 2(g) are allowed to escape. O 2(g) is one of the waste products from the process of photosynthesis: 6H 2 O + 6CO 2 C 6 H 12 O 6 + 6O 2 . O 2(g) must be released from the plant’s system before the process can continue. Water vapor is released from the plant in the act of transpiration. Transpiration is an unavoidable process once stomata are opened. It is also responsible for cooling the plant and allowing for the flow of nutrients from root to shoot. Plants are able to control this release of gas. They are able to open and close their stomata by making them either turgid or flaccid, respectively. By timing this opening and closing of the stomata correctly, plants can reduce excess water loss in the day when the sun is the strongest. Plants are also able to increase and decrease the number of stomata on their leaves. Plants in different environments have different density of stomata. In arid conditions, plants have less stomata in an attempt to prevent desiccation by dehydration. Plants in humid environments have an increased stomata density to balance their water intake. When there are more stomata, more CO 2(g) can be taken into the plant and, inversely, more H 2 O (g) can be released. Hypothesis When conducting our experiment we expect there to be a significant difference in the density of the stomata in our two samples, one taken from a sunny and moist area and the other from a shady and moist area. Therefore our null hypothesis suggests that there will be no significant difference in stomata density between our two samples.
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Method and Materials For this experiment, plant leaf samples were taken from two areas of the peripheral woody areas the bluff that Loyola Marymount resides on. One area was located in full sun while the other in full shade. We chose to analyze the stomata density of the castor bean plant, Ricinus communis. R. communis is a robust annual that is aclimated to the tropical and warm temperate regions of the world. It is commonly found in the southwestern United States along stream banks, river beds, and bottom lands. The species is easily identified by its large, tropical, palmately-
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This note was uploaded on 04/04/2008 for the course BIOL 112 taught by Professor Lum during the Spring '08 term at Loyola Marymount.

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Stomata Lab - A Comparison of the Differences in Stomata...

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