p111_lecture13

P111_lecture13 - Chapter 7 Impulse and Momentum 7.1 The Impulse-Momentum Theorem There are many situations when the force on an object is not

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 7 Impulse and Momentum
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
7.1 The Impulse-Momentum Theorem There are many situations when the force on an object is not constant.
Background image of page 2
7.1 The Impulse-Momentum Theorem DEFINITION OF IMPULSE The impulse of a force is the product of the average force and the time interval during which the force acts: t ! = F J r r Impulse is a vector quantity and has the same direction as the average force. s) (N seconds newton ! !
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
7.1 The Impulse-Momentum Theorem t ! = F J r r
Background image of page 4
7.1 The Impulse-Momentum Theorem DEFINITION OF LINEAR MOMENTUM The linear momentum of an object is the product of the object’s mass times its velocity: v p r r m = Linear momentum is a vector quantity and has the same direction as the velocity. m/s) (kg nd meter/seco kilogram ! !
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
7.1 The Impulse-Momentum Theorem t ! " = o f v v a r r r a F r r ! = m t m m ! " = # o f v v F r r r ( ) o f v v F r r r m m t ! = " #
Background image of page 6
7.1 The Impulse-Momentum Theorem ( ) o f v v F r r r m m t ! = " # final momentum initial momentum IMPULSE-MOMENTUM THEOREM When a net force acts on an object, the impulse of this force is equal to the change in the momentum of the object impulse
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
7.1 The Impulse-Momentum Theorem Example: Hitting a pitched baseball. A baseball of mass 0.14 kg is pitched at a batter with an initial velocity of -38 m/s (negative is towards the bat). The bat applies an average force that is much greater than the weight of the ball, and the ball departs from the bat with a final velocity
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 06/03/2011 for the course PHY 111 taught by Professor Bolland during the Fall '10 term at Ohio State.

Page1 / 22

P111_lecture13 - Chapter 7 Impulse and Momentum 7.1 The Impulse-Momentum Theorem There are many situations when the force on an object is not

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online