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p111_lecture13 - Chapter 7 Impulse and Momentum 7.1 The...

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Chapter 7 Impulse and Momentum
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7.1 The Impulse-Momentum Theorem There are many situations when the force on an object is not constant.
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7.1 The Impulse-Momentum Theorem DEFINITION OF IMPULSE The impulse of a force is the product of the average force and the time interval during which the force acts: t ! = F J r r Impulse is a vector quantity and has the same direction as the average force. s) (N seconds newton ! !
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7.1 The Impulse-Momentum Theorem t ! = F J r r
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7.1 The Impulse-Momentum Theorem DEFINITION OF LINEAR MOMENTUM The linear momentum of an object is the product of the object’s mass times its velocity: v p r r m = Linear momentum is a vector quantity and has the same direction as the velocity. m/s) (kg nd meter/seco kilogram ! !
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7.1 The Impulse-Momentum Theorem t ! " = o f v v a r r r a F r r ! = m t m m ! " = # o f v v F r r r ( ) o f v v F r r r m m t ! = " #
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7.1 The Impulse-Momentum Theorem ( ) o f v v F r r r m m t ! = " # final momentum initial momentum IMPULSE-MOMENTUM THEOREM When a net force acts on an object, the impulse of this force is equal to the change in the momentum of the object impulse
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7.1 The Impulse-Momentum Theorem Example: Hitting a pitched baseball. A baseball of mass 0.14 kg is pitched at a batter with an initial velocity of -38 m/s (negative is towards the bat). The bat applies an average force that is much greater than the weight of the ball, and the ball departs from the bat with a final velocity of +58 m/s. Assuming that the time of contact with the bat
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