LectureQ1

LectureQ1 - Chapter Q1 Introduction to Quantum Mechanics...

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3/28/2004 H133 Spring 2004 1 Chapter Q1 Introduction to Quantum Mechanics ± End of 19 th Century only a few loose ends to wrap up. ± Led to Relativity which you learned about last quarter ± Led to Quantum Mechanics (1920’s-30’s and beyond) ² Behavior of atomic and subatomic world ² Newton’s Laws don’t hold ± Foundation of most Physics Research that occurs these days. Basic Ideas behind Quantum Mechanics ± Small Particles behave like waves ² Not localized ² Interference effects (…more soon) ² Observations alter the system. o Basic quantities x, p o In QM if you try to determine x you will effect p and visa versa. ² Implies bound systems have quantized states (Atomic Spectra) ± Waves (EM) behave like particles. We need to understand Classical wave first.
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3/28/2004 H133 Spring 2004 2 Classical Waves •B a s i c s ± Waves are a disturbance that travel in a medium. ² e.g. water waves ² Note: Particles in the medium are not traveling along with the wave. ± We will look at 1-D wave to begin. Two types of waves ± Tension Wave (sometime called transverse) ² e.g. wave on a string. ± Compress ional Wave (sometimes call longitudinal) ² e.g. sound wave Demo Equilibrium Position Tube
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3/28/2004 H133 Spring 2004 3 Function of position and time Also common to think about functions with sines and cosines…more later. Mathematical Representation () 2 2 2 ) , ( e.g. , σ bt x Ae t x f t x f = 0 = x s t 10 = s t 0 = s t 20 = x
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3/28/2004 H133 Spring 2004 4 Superposition Principle If two waves described by f 1 (x,t) and f 2 (x,t) are moving in a medium, the combined wave is described by the algebraic sum of the two waves f tot (x,t) = f 1 (x,t)+f 2 (x,t) This is a powerful statement even though it seems quite simple.
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This note was uploaded on 06/03/2011 for the course H 133 taught by Professor Furnstahl during the Spring '11 term at Ohio State.

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LectureQ1 - Chapter Q1 Introduction to Quantum Mechanics...

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