AAA351FINALPAPER - Human beings pay tribute to what they...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
“Human beings pay tribute to what they believe one possesses in the way of qualities of mind and heart, rather than to the color of the skin” (“Black Collegian Online”). Ida B. Wells-Barnett Laura Brady April 13, 2010 AAA 351
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ida B. Wells-Barnett was born as a slave in 1862 in Holly Springs, Mississippi. Her father, James, was a carpenter and a politician and her mother, Elizabeth, was a cook. They both worked for the same master and stayed to work for him after the emancipation proclamation was signed. James’ involvement with politics allowed him to gain the opportunity to become a trustee of Rust College, a freedman’s school, where Ida attended after the proclamation was passed. Ida had seven siblings, however many of them died from yellow fever, along with her parents, when she was only 16 years old. Shortly after Ida was orphaned, she lied about her age, stating that she was 18, in order to gain a teaching position for a salary of $25 dollars a month to help support herself and her remaining siblings. Her brothers moved in with her aunt in Memphis, Tennessee and became apprentices (Tolliver). A few years later, Ida and her two younger sisters moved to Memphis to live with her brothers and aunt to save money and get an education while doing so. She gained a job as a teacher and went to Fisk University in the summers to improve her education. After Ida made enough money, her family moved out of her Aunt’s house and into a home of their own. When she went away to school, family members or friends would come and take care of the remaining children. She ended up getting her degree and taught 1 st grade for seven years at the local elementary school.
Background image of page 2
On May 4, 1884, Ida was on a train and was forced to move from her seat in the women’s car and back into the smoking car, and when she refused, the conductor tried to physically remove her from the car
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 7

AAA351FINALPAPER - Human beings pay tribute to what they...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online