III) Interacting with others

III) Interacting with others - III) Interacting with...

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6/4/11 III) Interacting with others: Hope you’re enjoying your cuppa Barbara… now you had better lend me that sowing machine…
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6/4/11 Social interactions
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6/4/11 Classifying social
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6/4/11 Altruism From Merriam-Webster: 1 : unselfish regard for or devotion to the welfare of others 2 : behavior by an animal that is not beneficial to or may be harmful to itself but that benefits others of its species
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6/4/11 A quick example of altruism Vervet monkeys give alarm calls to warn the rest of the troop of predators (lizards, snakes and eagles)
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6/4/11 Altruism – mini discussion Why were evolutionary biologists initially dumbfounded by the existence of altruism in nature? 6 Is it possible to explain it from an evolutionary perspective or is it just a quirk of animal behavior?
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6/4/11 My theory of natural selection is watertight. I am the man. What about those animals who help others to the detriment of themselves? That’s just weird.
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6/4/11 Inclusive fitness: an Altruistic behavior
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6/4/11 The hypothetical Green Hypothetically, if an gene can identify itself in another individual and code for a behavior that assists that individual, it may increase its inclusive fitness and increase in frequency. Richard Dawkins coined the possibility the ‘Green Beard Effect’, and there has been some recent evidence in support the hypothesis in single celled organisms.
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6/4/11 6 Altruism towards family members
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6/4/11 Increasing inclusive fitness Altruism that increases inclusive fitness is directed towards relatives who have a certain probability (depending on how related they are) of also hosting the gene(s) encoding the altruistic behavior as well as other genes that go along for the ride.
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6/4/11 Kin selection (II): The likelihood that 2 individuals share copies of any particular gene is their probability of identity by descent (or coefficient of relatedness). This (of course) depends on how related they are.
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6/4/11 Kin selection (III): Altruistic genes will increase in frequency as long as: r B>C r = the genetic relatedness of the recipient to the actor, often defined as the probability that a gene picked randomly from
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This note was uploaded on 06/04/2011 for the course PCB 4043 taught by Professor Osenberg during the Fall '10 term at University of Florida.

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III) Interacting with others - III) Interacting with...

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