Synthesis and Overview

Synthesis and Overview - Synthesis & Overview 6/4/11 6 Aim...

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6/4/11 Synthesis Overview
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6/4/11 6 Aim of this lecture : - Give you a resource to guide your revision for the final test (you should still read through your notes, lectures and the text book for context and a full understanding – you will be tested on overall understanding as well as facts)
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6/4/11 Subjects covered since last Predation 6 Positive interactions 6 Food webs 6 Disturbance ecology 6 Island Biogeography 6 Community structure and dynamics 6 Biodiversity and conservation 6 You have probably realized by now that many of these subjects are interrelated.
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Click to edit Master subtitle style 6/4/11 Predation Predator- prey and coevolutio n Positive interactio ns Food webs Disturban ce ecology Island biogeogra phy Communit y structure and dynamics Biodiversi ty and Conservat ion
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6/4/11 Central theme The unifying theme of this section of the course has been: THE ECOLOGICAL COMMUNITY The material we have covered explores these questions: 1) What is a community? 2) How do species interact in communities? 3) How do we study communities?
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6/4/11 6 1) What is a community?
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6/4/11 What is a ‘community’ Definition : A community is defined as an assemblage of species living close enough together for potential interaction. Communities differ in the extent to which they are distinct/delineated
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6/4/11 Closed vs. open *Closed community: Species have similar geographic ranges and density peaks, forming a discrete unit with sharp boundaries known as ecotones . *An open community , populations distributed according to continuous variation in environmental conditions. Distinct boundaries between communities do not form . In the case of open communities, the value of the community concept has been questioned…
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6/4/11 Closed
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6/4/11 Species interactions Individuals within communities (whether they are open or closed) by definition live close enough to individuals of other species for interactions to take place. 6 One of the unifying themes of community ecology is the study of species interactions… which helps us to address the next question:
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6/4/11 6 2) How do species interact in communities?
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6/4/11 Disperal filter Species interaction filter Regional species pool Local community Abiotic filter Who’s invited to the party? Species interactions get the final say (and they determine how many guests each species can bring)
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6/4/11 Species interactions What do we mean by ‘ interaction ’? Simply, one affects the other (may be one way or both ways). 6 Individuals of one species can affect individuals of another through negative (competition [- -] and consumer-resource [+ -]) and positive (facilitation: mutualism [+ +], commensalism [- -]) species interactions .
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6/4/11 Competition (- -) Competition can lead to the exclusion of inferior competitors from an area of habitat that would otherwise be suitable . Note Connell’s barnacle study and Gause’s classic study with Paramecium. In less extreme cases, competition reduces
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This note was uploaded on 06/04/2011 for the course PCB 4043 taught by Professor Osenberg during the Fall '10 term at University of Florida.

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Synthesis and Overview - Synthesis & Overview 6/4/11 6 Aim...

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