LPL 9.6 lecture

LPL 9.6 lecture - More translations with quantifiers One of...

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More translations with quantifiers One of the difficulties in translating quantified English expressions is dealing with the complex noun phrases they contain. Here, we are replacing simple noun phrases like “a cube” and “every student” with more complex ones like: “a boy living in Omaha” “every girl living in Duluth” The first of these is called an existential noun phrase, which is usually translated with an existential quantifier that scopes over a conjunction. A small, happy dog is at home . The other type of complex noun phrase is called a universal noun phrase, which is usually translated with a universal quantifier that scopes over a conditional statement. Every small dog that is at home is happy. When translating English expressions that contain complex noun phrases, it is often helpful to group the components of the noun phrase and isolate them from what is predicated of the noun phrase. In other words, keep the pieces of the subject together and separate from the rest of the sentence. A large cube is in front of
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LPL 9.6 lecture - More translations with quantifiers One of...

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