ENHS660.Eutrophication+adobe+2010

ENHS660.Eutrophication+adobe+2010 - Quick Overview of...

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Quick Overview of Eutrophication Nutrient enrichment problem is world-wide Manifestations of problem can be different (e.g. low oxygen, loss of SAV, toxic HABs, macroalgae) Scientific controversies remain re. interplay of N & P anthropogenic vs. natural factors, lags, climate, etc. Some uncertainties re. seriousness of impact; some claim that there are benefits (e.g. to fisheries) High degree of management awareness – perceived as the most serious pollution problem to estuaries in U.S. Management action usually well after system is considerably overenriched With few exceptions, management actions to date have been ineffective at reversing impacts
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The Problem – The Model High algal production Loss of water clarity Epiphyte problems Macroalgal problems Fish kills Loss of habitat Human health risks Loss of Tourism Closed fishing grounds Loss of SAV Low D.O Nuisance/Toxic HAB Blooms Increased N and P concentration Symptoms and Consequences of Nutrient Enrichment Nutrient Inputs Primary Secondary Consequences and Processing Impacts Impacts of Symptoms
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Eutrophication: Primary Symptoms Decrease Light Penetration – Overproduction of algae leads to increased turbidity, decreased light penetration, & increased Chlorophyll A (a byproduct of plant metabolism) - Overgrowth of macroalgae (seaweed) Algal Speciation Changes – opportunistic plant species (diatoms flagellates & benthic pelagic alage) = alters food quality (e.g. Ches. Bay – 90% decline in oysters reduces filtratration rate of bay from 4-5 days to 365 days) Increased Organic Matter Decomposition
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Eutrophication: Secondary Symptoms Loss of Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Increased Hypoxia Increased Occurrence of Harmful Algal Bloom (HABs)
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Tampa Bay y = -0.6532x 3 + 3891.9x 2 - 8E+06x + 5E+09 R 2 = 0.9742 0 10000 20000 30000 40000 50000 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 Acres Dawes et al 2004 SWFWMD Seagrass Mappping Tampa Bay Load Reduction Progress, Initial improvement in SAV coverage but now stalled; population trends suggest additional challenges regionally
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Eutrophication: Secondary Symptoms Loss of Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Increased Hypoxia Increased Occurrence of Harmful Algal Bloom (HABs)
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Hypoxia means “ low oxygen ”. In aquatic and marine systems, low oxygen generally refers to a dissolved oxygen concentration < 2 to 3 milligrams of oxygen per liter of water (mg/L), but sensitive organisms can be affected at higher thresholds (4.5 mg/L). A complete lack of oxygen is called anoxia . Hypoxic waters generally do not
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This note was uploaded on 06/06/2011 for the course ENHS 660 taught by Professor Scott during the Fall '10 term at South Carolina.

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ENHS660.Eutrophication+adobe+2010 - Quick Overview of...

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