influenza - Kaytlyn Hargrave Dr. Peirce HIS164H April 24,...

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Kaytlyn Hargrave Dr. Peirce HIS164H April 24, 2011 Influenza 1918 What started as a strange sickness in an Army camp in Kansas would eventually go on to kill more people than all the wars of the past century combined. The influenza epidemic of 1918 killed approximately half a million people in America alone. People were dying within hours of becoming sick. Death was so commonplace during the fall of 1918 that some children sang a rhyme about a little bird named Enza while skipping rope while others played on the pine boxes on the sidewalks that contained that day’s dead. This massive epidemic has largely faded from the American memory and yet its lessons are evident today. March 11, 1918 was the first day of a freak occurrence. Five hundred privates in the course of one week in an Army camp in Kansas fell ill. Forty-eight of the young men died. At the time, no one knew what was coming. The disease followed those soldiers from Kansas as they went to fight in World War I. Deaths from the illness rose.
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This note was uploaded on 06/06/2011 for the course HIST 164 taught by Professor Crimm during the Spring '08 term at Sam Houston State University.

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influenza - Kaytlyn Hargrave Dr. Peirce HIS164H April 24,...

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