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Assingment 2 Draft 2 - Thinking is a Game Thinking is more...

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Thinking is a Game Thinking is more like a game. As a gamer begins the game and moves from one level to another, a thinker also starts to think and moves from one level to another. During the World War 2, William Golding writes “Thinking as a Hobby”, in which he describes the term “thinking”. Similarly, in “In the laboratory with Agassiz”, Samuel H. Scudder narrates his experience with Professor Agassiz and how it brought changes in his educational career. William categorizes thinking into three simple levels. When William was a little boy he “didn’t think, wasn’t thinking, and couldn’t think”, he was just not able to interpret what his teachers wanted from him. The term “thinking” was first introduced to him and all other students by the headmaster of their grammar school assuming that the students including William would be excited and ask questions to the headmaster, but this was not true in William’s case. For instance, when William saw the three statuettes on his headmaster’s study table, he interpreted the statuettes as: a lady wearing nothing but a bath towel and seemed frozen in an eternal panic; a naked, muscular gentleman, who sat, looking down, with chin on his fist and his elbow on his knee as utterly miserable; and a statuette of a leopard, ready to spring down as victim’s last, despairing cry. Samuel H. Scudder also had a similar problem which he explains in his article “In the Laboratory with Agassiz”. Samuel wished to study zoology, specifically to devote his time on studying insects, but his lab professor Agassiz, had a different exercise in his mind for Samuel.
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