Glossary English 1102

Glossary English 1102 - Arthur Begtine Dr. McIntyre English...

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Arthur Begtine Dr. McIntyre English 1102/01 Glossary Centrifugal Force : The apparent force that is felt by an object moving in a curved path that acts outwardly away from the center of rotation. Source: Webster’s Collegiate American Dictionary Online. Oedipus Complex : The positive libidinal feelings of a child toward the parent of the opposite sex and hostile or jealous feelings toward the parent of the same sex that in Freudian psychoanalytic theory may be a source of adult personality disorder when unresolved. Source: Webster’s Collegiate American Dictionary Online. Onomatopoeia : The use of words whose sound suggests the sense. Source: Webster’s Collegiate American Dictionary Online. Triarchy : Government by three persons. Source: Webster’s Collegiate American Dictionary Online. Analogue : Something that is analogous or similar to something else. Source: Webster’s Collegiate American Dictionary Online. Ubiquitous : Existing or being everywhere at the same time. Source: Webster’s Collegiate American Dictionary Online.
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Actuate : To put into mechanical action or motion. Source: Webster’s Collegiate American Dictionary Online. Cognize : Know, understand. Source: Webster’s Collegiate American Dictionary Online. Semantic : Of or relating to meaning in language. Source: Webster’s Collegiate American Dictionary Online. Spectrum : A continuum of color formed when a beam of white light is dispersed (as by passage through a prism) so that its component wavelengths are arranged in order. Source: Webster’s Collegiate American Dictionary Online. Ex nihilo : From or out of nothing. Source: Webster’s Collegiate American Dictionary Online. Etymology : The history of a linguistic form (as a word) shown by tracing its development since its earliest recorded occurrence in the language where it is found, by tracing its transmission from one language to another, by analyzing it into its component parts, by identifying its cognates in other languages, or by tracing it and its cognates to a common ancestral form in an ancestral language. Source: Webster’s Collegiate American Dictionary Online.
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This note was uploaded on 06/06/2011 for the course ENG 1102 taught by Professor Mcintyre during the Spring '11 term at Kennesaw.

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Glossary English 1102 - Arthur Begtine Dr. McIntyre English...

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