Ch1 - Chapter 1 Introduction Chapter 1 1.1 1-1 Introduction Embedded systems overview Computing systems are everywhere Its probably no surprise

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Chapter 1: Introduction Embedded System Design, Vahid/Givargis Last update: 09/27/99 2:51 PM 1-1 Chapter 1 Introduction 1.1 Embedded systems overview Computing systems are everywhere. It’s probably no surprise that millions of computing systems are built every year destined for desktop computers (Personal Computers, or PC’s), workstations, mainframes and servers. What may be surprising is that billions of computing systems are built every year for a very different purpose: they are embedded within larger electronic devices, repeatedly carrying out a particular function, often going completely unrecognized by the device’s user. Creating a precise definition of such embedded computing systems, or simply embedded systems , is not an easy task. We might try the following definition: An embedded system is nearly any computing system other than a desktop, laptop, or mainframe computer. That definition isn’t perfect, but it may be as close as we’ll get. We can better understand such systems by examining common examples and common characteristics. Such examination will reveal major challenges facing designers of such systems. Embedded systems are found in a variety of common electronic devices, such as: (a) consumer electronics -- cell phones, pagers, digital cameras, camcorders, videocassette recorders, portable video games, calculators, and personal digital assistants; (b) home appliances -- microwave ovens, answering machines, thermostat, home security, washing machines, and lighting systems; (c) office automation -- fax machines, copiers, printers, and scanners; (d) business equipment -- cash registers, curbside check-in, alarm systems, card readers, product scanners, and automated teller machines; (e) automobiles -- transmission control, cruise control, fuel injection, anti-lock brakes, and active suspension. One might say that nearly any device that runs on electricity either already has, or will soon have, a computing system embedded within it. While about 40% of American households had a desktop computer in 1994, each household had an average of more than 30 embedded computers, with that number expected to rise into the hundreds by the year 2000. The electronics in an average car cost $1237 in 1995, and may cost $2125 by 2000. Several billion embedded microprocessor units were sold annually in recent years, compared to a few hundred million desktop microprocessor units. Embedded systems have several common characteristics: 1) Single-functioned: An embedded system usually executes only one program, repeatedly. For example, a pager is always a pager. In contrast, a desktop system executes a variety of programs, like spreadsheets, word processors, and video games, with new programs added frequently. 1
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This note was uploaded on 06/02/2011 for the course CS 550 taught by Professor Young during the Spring '11 term at New York Institute of Technology-Westbury.

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Ch1 - Chapter 1 Introduction Chapter 1 1.1 1-1 Introduction Embedded systems overview Computing systems are everywhere Its probably no surprise

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