Physics1C_Chapter35

Physics1C_Chapter35 - CHAPTER 35 INTERFERENCE VahPeroomian...

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CHAPTER 35 INTERFERENCE Vahé Peroomian
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LIGHT FROM A POINT SOURCE A snapshot of waves of frequency f and wavelength λ spreading out from point S 1 in all directions. Ray approximation of light is useful for solving reflection and refraction problems.
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LIGHT FROM TWO COHERENT SOURCES When multiple sources of light interact, the wave nature of light becomes apparent.
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LIGHT FROM TWO COHERENT SOURCES Sinusoidal waves from two coherent sources can interfere constructively or destructively at various locations.
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CONSTRUCTIVE INTERFERENCE Waves interfere constructively if their path lengths differ by an integral number of wavelengths. r 2 - r 1 = ml
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DESTRUCTIVE INTERFERENCE Waves interfere destructively if their path lengths differ by a half-integral number of wavelengths. r 2 - r 1 = ( m + 1 2 ) l
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INTERFERENCE PATTERNS Red antinodal curves show locations of maximum amplitude.
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INTERFERENCE PATTERNS
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INTERFERENCE IN LIGHT WAVES Young’s Experiment: The two slits S 1 and S 2 behave as coherent sources of light waves that produce an interference pattern on the viewing screen.
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BRIGHT AND DARK BANDS… WHY? The light waves from S 1 and S 2 travel the same distance to reach the center of the viewing screen in phase, giving constructive interference. At other points P on the screen, the light waves from S 1 and S 2 arrive in a way that the two waves are in phase, also giving constructive interference at these locations.
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BRIGHT AND DARK BANDS… WHY? In between O and P, the light waves from S 1 and S 2 are out of phase with each other and destructive interference results. Dark fringes occur when two waves are completely out of phase (i.e. peaks line up with valleys).
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QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF YOUNG’S EXPERIMENT
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LOCATIONS OF BRIGHT AND DARK BANDS Bright bands (constructive interference) occur when Dark bands (destructive interference) occur when d = d sin q = ( m + 1 2 ) l Zeroth order  maximum First order  maximum First order  maximum = d sin q = ml
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LOCATIONS OF BRIGHT AND DARK BANDS y bright = L ml d ae è ç ç ç ö ø ÷ ÷ ÷ y dark = L ( m + 1 2 ) l d ae è ç ç ç ç ç ç ç ç ö ø ÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ ÷
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This note was uploaded on 06/03/2011 for the course PHYSICS 1c taught by Professor Peroomian during the Spring '10 term at UCLA.

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Physics1C_Chapter35 - CHAPTER 35 INTERFERENCE VahPeroomian...

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