SANDS10 - Sequences and Series: An Introduction to...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Sequences and Series: An Introduction to Mathematical Analysis by Malcolm R. Adams c circlecopyrt 2010 Contents 1 Sequences 1 1.1 The general concept of a sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 The sequence of natural numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 1.3 Sequences as functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 1.4 Convergence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 1.5 Tools for Computing Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 1.6 What is Reality? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 1.7 Some Results from Calculus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 2 Series 77 2.1 Introduction to Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 2.2 Series with Nonnegative Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 2.3 Series with Terms of Both Signs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 2.4 Power Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 3 Sequences and Series of Functions 107 3.1 Uniform Convergence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 3.2 Taylor Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 3.3 Complex Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 i Chapter 1 Sequences 1.1 The general concept of a sequence We begin by discussing the concept of a sequence. Intuitively, a sequence is an ordered list of objects or events. For instance, the sequence of events at a crime scene is important for understanding the nature of the crime. In this course we will be interested in sequences of a more mathematical nature; mostly we will be interested in sequences of numbers, but occasionally we will find it interesting to consider sequences of points in a plane or in space, or even sequences of sets. Lets look at some examples of sequences. Example 1.1.1 Emily ips a quarter five times, the sequence of coin tosses is HTTHT where H stands for heads and T stands for tails. As a side remark, we might notice that there are 2 5 = 32 different possible sequences of five coin tosses. Of these, 10 have two heads and three tails. Thus the probability that in a sequence of five coin tosses, two of them are heads and three are tails is 10 / 32, or 5 / 16. Many probabilistic questions involve studying sets of sequences such as these. Example 1.1.2 John picks colored marbles from a bag, first he picks a red marble, then a blue one, another blue one, a yellow one, a red one and finally a blue one. The sequence of marbles he has chosen could be represented by the symbols RBBYRB. 1 2 CHAPTER 1. SEQUENCES Example 1.1.3 Harry the Hare set out to walk to the neighborhood grocery. In the first ten minutes he walked half way to the grocery. In the next ten minutes he walked half of the remaining distance, so now he was 3/4 of the way to the grocery. In the following ten minutes he walked half of the remaining distance again, so now he has managed to get 7/8 of the way to the grocery....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 06/06/2011 for the course MATH 3100 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at University of Georgia Athens.

Page1 / 142

SANDS10 - Sequences and Series: An Introduction to...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online