Chapter 2 - Ch 2 Celestial Navigation Imagine you leave on...

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Imagine you leave on an ocean voyage from a harbor, but get lost in the middle of the ocean. You don’t have a compass or GPS. How would you find your way using the night sky? Ch. 2 Celestial Navigation
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Polaris ? ? ?
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Polaris NW N NE
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But how do you find Polaris?
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But how do you find Polaris? Big Dipper Polaris
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Constellations 88 in total
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Constellation of Orion Are the stars in a constellation physically close or associated?
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3-D of Stars in Orion
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What do we need to measure to describe relative positions of stars?
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Need to measure angles on the sky to quantify relative positions, or to describe how big things appear. How do we measure angles?
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Angular Measure 1 degree = 60 arc min. 1 arc min. = 60 arc seconds
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Another unit of angle: radians What is a radian?
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Another unit of angle: radians What is a radian?
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Another unit of angle: radians What is a radian? 360 degrees = 2 π radians 1 radian = 57.3 degrees = 57.3 x 3600 arcsec = 206,265 arcsec
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How many coordinates do we need to specify position of an object on the sky? How do we specify locations on the surface of the Earth? Locating Objects in the Sky
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Equatorial Coordinates Right Ascension: Like longitude Measured in hr, min, seconds E or W from vernal equinox Declination: Like latitude Measured in degrees, minutes, seconds from the equatorial plane
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Celestial Coordinates
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Horizon System of Coordinates
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Does the sky look exactly the same every day and night?
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What kind of changes do you notice from day to day or night to night?
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Chapter 2 - Ch 2 Celestial Navigation Imagine you leave on...

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