Ch4 - Chapter 4. Process Analysis A Systematic Approach...

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Chapter 4. Process Analysis A Systematic Approach Documenting the Process Flowcharts Service Blueprints Process Charts Evaluating Performance Redesigning the Process Managing Processes
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Process Analysis Processes may be the least understood and managed aspect of a business A firm can not gain a competitive advantage with faulty processes Processes can be analyzed and improved using certain tools and techniques Process analysis can be accomplished using a six-step blueprint Identify Opportunities Define the Scope Document the Process Evaluate Performance Redesign the Process Implement Changes Plan Do Check Act PDCA Cycle
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Documenting The Process Three effective techniques for documenting and evaluating processes are 1) Flowcharts 2) Service blueprints 3) Process charts They help you see how a process operates and how well it is performing Can help find performance gaps Two key thoughts: 1.You must see and understand any process you are trying to document! 2.Collect your own data whenever possible!
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Barley Harvest Irish Whiskey is made from barley, malt (germinated barley) and water Storage Historically, the barley required for production was purchased locally after the autumn harvest. Farmers using horse carts would bring their grain to the distillery. Drying and Screening Grain is dried and screened before being moved in the grain store. The kiln, fired with a smokeless fuel called anthracite, provides indirect heat. In Scotland peat smoke is blown through the grain during this step. Storage Dried dormant grain was moved to the grain store. Before grain elevators were installed, med would carry 224 lb sacks up several floors. Steeping and Malting As needed, grain was delivered to the Maltings where barley was first soaked for approximately 4 days. As the grain germinated it was turned to prevent overheating. Drying The kiln, again using anthracite, was used to dry the malted grain. Drying at this step also halts germination. Milling A cast iron waterwheel turned 5 sets of millstones to grind malt and barley into grist. Mashing Barley and malt were combined with boiling water and the mixture stirred with large rotating rakes. Worts, the resulting liquid, contained fermentable sugars. Cooling The worts were cooled and sent to the Washbacks for fermentation Fermenting Yeast was added to the cooled worts. After three days of fermentation, the sugars in the worts were converted to alcohol. This mixture, known as Wash, was approximately 16 proof at this point. Triple Distillation Wash was fed into the first of three stills. Fires were lit under the still and as the wash reached a temperature of 170 degrees F alcohol vapors were collected. The condensed alcohol was then distilled again in the Feints still and finally in the Spirits still. After all distillation the spirits are 160 proof.
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Ch4 - Chapter 4. Process Analysis A Systematic Approach...

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