Arugment - What is an Argument? 1) What is an argument, as...

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What is an Argument? 1) What is an argument, as we have been using the term in this course? What are the two main kinds of argument? An argument, as per the course, is a series of premises stated in a (hopefully) logical order that leads to a conclusive statement about a subject. Such ‘arguments’ are a form of stating one’s opinion on a subject, and must be properly utilized in order for one to be understood – or for one’s opinion to valuable. The two main types of argument are known as “Deductive” and “Inductive” reasoning. - A ‘deductive’ argument is one in which the truth of the conclusion is a logical outcome based upon the previously stated premises. For example: P1) I am using a computer to write this paper. P2) To write on a computer, I type. P3) Typing does not require the use of a pen. C) I am not writing this paper with a pen. - An ‘Inductive’ argument is one in which the premises lead to the conclusion, in a strictly supportive manner. Often an assumption is made, or the validity of the statement is based
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Arugment - What is an Argument? 1) What is an argument, as...

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