b_lab_6 - BryanJacobs Mon79PM LabPartner:CameronRison Lab6

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Bryan Jacobs Mon 7-9PM Lab Partner: Cameron Rison Lab 6-  Simple Harmonic Motion
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Bryan Jacobs Mon 7-9PM Lab Partner: Cameron Rison Introduction: The main objective of lab 6 is to test whether energy is conserved in simple harmonic motion under the influence of a spring by proving that in its rotation the total energy of the system will be conserved and that an object under the influence of a force will experience an acceleration in the direction of that force. For this case we used two identical springs and one air puck in order to minimize the friction against the table. Because a spring obeys Hooke’s law, F=-kx, we know that any object under the influence of a net force will experience an acceleration following the direction of the force. T is the period, the time it takes each revolution (1/ Δt(s)) according to our sight. is the initial value of the angle related to the initial position by the radius. To record Ө the position we used a spark generator and the puck will travel its path and the position will be recorded in a paper with a variable interval in Hz, we used 20 Hz, which means a spark each 0.05 seconds (Δt). A(in meters, largest value from x(n) to x=0, taken to the absolute value) was the largest xn value, which were the distances away from the origin. Note that the x(m) values to the left of the origin. We saw an oscillation on the lab is because the force exerted on the spring to begin the experiment was stored as potential energy (U=1/2 kx(m)^2) (J). K, the spring constant gave us the strength of the spring, was calculated by k=ω^2*m(in N/m). Although we had two springs, they were of equal strength and the center of the puck was when they were equally stretched, so there would be no potential energy at the center of motion. The potential energy, when decreasing, turned into kinetic energy, in which we later calculated. W is the angular speed (m/s) and can be obtained by w=2π/T,
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b_lab_6 - BryanJacobs Mon79PM LabPartner:CameronRison Lab6

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