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Sexuality-and-the-Law-Ettelbrick-Sp06

Sexuality-and-the-Law-Ettelbrick-Sp06 - SEXUALITY AND THE...

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S EXUALITY   AND   THE  L AW P ROF . P AULA  E TTELBRICK  • S PRING  2006 C ASEBOOK : E SKRIDGE  & H UNTER , S EXUALITY , G ENDER AND   THE  L AW , 2 D  E D . I.Privacy ........................................................................................................................................... 2 II.Foundations of the Right to Privacy (p. 3-43) .............................................................................. 2 III.State Regulation of Sex Outside Marriage (p. 44-164) ............................................................... 3 IV.Sexuality, Gender, and State Discrimination ............................................................................. 8 V.Equality Challenges (p. 165-176) ............................................................................................... 8 VI.Sex Discrimination (p. 177-216) ................................................................................................ 8 VII.Sexual Orientation Discrimination (p.217-297) ...................................................................... 10 VIII.Identity Speech in the Body Politic ........................................................................................ 12 IX.Obscenity and Political Speech (p. 323-360) ........................................................................... 12 X.Identity and Viewpoint (p. 371-418) .......................................................................................... 13 XI.Sexually Explicit Expression (p.419-474) ................................................................................ 14 XII.Theories of Sexuality, Gender, and the Law .......................................................................... 16 XIII.Models for Thinking About Sexuality (p. 501-504) .............................................................. 16 XIV.Natural Law Theories (p. 505-519) ....................................................................................... 16 XV.Modern Theories (p.520-583) ................................................................................................. 17 XVI.Sexuality and Gender in the Workplace ............................................................................... 21 XVII.Sex Discrimination (p. 765-771, 802-829 and 840-853) ...................................................... 21 XVIII.Sexual Orientation Discrimination (p. 771-783, 799-801, and 865-883) ........................... 25 XIX.Sexuality and Gender in Education (p.901-927) ................................................................... 26 XX.Family Law ............................................................................................................................. 27 XXI.Privatization of Family Law (p. 1035-1062) ......................................................................... 27 XXII.Expansion of Marriage to Same-Sex and Other Couples (p.1063-1110) ............................. 28 XXIII.Surrogacy, Custody, and Visitation (p. 1139-1177) ........................................................... 29 XXIV.Adoption and De Facto Parenting (p.198-1216 and 1225-1226) ........................................ 30 XXV.Polyparenting (P. 1227-1237) .............................................................................................. 30 XXVI.Sexuality, Gender, and Immigration and International Law .............................................. 31 XXVII.Immigration (p. 1360-1381) .............................................................................................. 31 XXVIII.Citizenship (p. 1382-1390) ............................................................................................... 32 XXIX.International Norms (p. 1391-1417) ................................................................................... 32 XXX.Transgender Issues .............................................................................................................. 33 XXXI.From Morals to Medicalization (p. 1419-1440) ................................................................. 33 XXXII.From Disease to Disability (p. 1441-1460) ....................................................................... 34 XXXIII.Challenges to Core Meanings (p. 1461-1497) ................................................................. 34 1 of 35   
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I. P RIVACY II. F OUNDATIONS   OF   THE  R IGHT   TO  P RIVACY  ( P . 3-43) i. Birth control movement: 1. Birth control activists could be charged under the Comstock Law,  a federal obscenity statute.  2. Margaret Sanger at the forefront of the fight to make birth control  available to women; her strategy was a health care one and  involved arguing that doctors should have the discretion to provide  patients with birth control. Courts, after initial reluctance, were  receptive to this strategy.   3. Another advocate, Mary Ware Dennett, argued that the issue was a  free speech one. Her strategy was less successful in the courts. 4. Arguments also made on basis of race, women’s sexuality, public  health, and privacy claims.  ii. Beginnings of substantive due process privacy rights recognition by the  Supreme Court: 1. Meyer v. Nebraska      struck down a law prohibiting teaching foreign  languages in schools and Pierce v. Society of Sisters  struck down  law requiring all children attend public school. Cases didn’t refer  to “privacy” but expanded understanding of “liberty” under 14 th  Amendment Due Process Clause.
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