lecture3 - Course Subsection Outline 1. Amino Acids 2....

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Copyright 2002 University of Florida. All Rights Reserved Course Subsection Outline 1. Amino Acids 2. Peptides and Peptide Bonds 3. Three-dimensional Structure of Proteins 4. Protein Dynamics and Protein Folding 5. Protein Function, Myoglobin and Hemoglobin 6. Protein Function, Contractile and Motile Systems
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Copyright 2002 University of Florida. All Rights Reserved General Characteristics of Protein Structure 2. The amide group must remain in a planer orientation relative to the carboxyl group in the peptide bond. In general, the α -carbons on adjacent AA’s are in a trans configuration. . 1. No two atoms on groups of a molecule can approach each other closer than allowed by their van der Waals radii .
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Copyright 2002 University of Florida. All Rights Reserved Structure of the Peptide Bond Peptide bond is a resonance hybrid of two structures so that O=C-N-H are co-planar Peptide bond is nearly always in a trans configuration since the steric hindrance of side chains is greater for a cis configuration Figure 6.2, p. 162: Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry
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Copyright 2002 University of Florida. All Rights Reserved Peptide “planar” angle Edison, Nature Structural Biology 2001:8;201-202
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Copyright 2002 University of Florida. All Rights Reserved General Characteristics of Protein Structure (continued) 4. Because of this rotational freedom, non-covalent bonding is necessary to stabilize a regular folded protein structure (e.g. hydrogen bonding between the amino hydrogen on one AA and a carbonyl oxygen on another). 3. AA residues can rotate about covalent bonds to the α -carbon so that the peptide-bond planes can rotate relative to each other. Also the side chains have additional degrees of rotational freedom about covalent bonds. φ ψ
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Copyright 2002 University of Florida. All Rights Reserved Steric Hindrance of Peptide Planes Since rotations around the peptide bond are not possible, the planes (defined by adjacent peptide bond) are too hindered to overlap. This
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This note was uploaded on 06/07/2011 for the course BCH 4024 taught by Professor Allison during the Fall '08 term at University of Florida.

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lecture3 - Course Subsection Outline 1. Amino Acids 2....

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