ALD327Book2ReviewPaper

ALD327Book2ReviewPaper - Griffin Warner ALD327 November 17,...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Griffin Warner ALD327 November 17, 2009 Book I I Review In the United States, it is almost traditional for African American men and women to be enrolled in disadvantaged schools. Statistics show that black student-athletes graduate at a much lower rate than white teammates, and their backgrounds in education deserve the blame. Underlying racism in the American system needs to be removed, and teachers must make a concerted effort to decrease the gap. The Dreamkeepers: Successful Teachers of African American Children gives readers various viewpoints demonstrating the issues blacks have with the current education program, and it offers opinions on how to fix it. Gloria Ladson-Billings’ book has a strong central theme that remains consistent throughout the 202 pages. It operates around the thought that African Americans lag behind their white counterparts on standard academic achievement measures. She tried to put quantifiable information behind the assumptions made by her subjects, and she did a good job using numbers to fortify the statements made by her subjects and herself. Scholars, teachers and parents are all showcased throughout the book, and they make very strong points in regard to the racial divide in public education. They declared that segregation has increased even with considerable efforts being made to even the playing field. Stories from childhood about how the characters saw segregation in their own education are told like when one subject said, “School seemed like home…everyone there was black.” Race-based laws created in the southern United States after the Civil War were also referenced because that legislation still directly affects the equality of schools in the south. “The well-equipped Jim Crow school is a rare exception,” but undoing segregation does not solve everything. Ladson-Billings suggested that problems present themselves when policies change. “Most inner-city students already attend de facto segregated schools…[but] desegregating schools benefits whites more than African Americans,” the author said....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 06/07/2011 for the course ALD 327 taught by Professor Brown during the Spring '11 term at University of Texas.

Page1 / 6

ALD327Book2ReviewPaper - Griffin Warner ALD327 November 17,...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online